Admissions

Students must have and/or complete the following entrance requirements to join the Ed.D. program:

  • Hold a master’s degree from an accredited or otherwise recognized institution.
  • Provide a resume/C.V. that demonstrates two or more years in a leadership capacity.
  • Provide three references with name, title, email, and phone contact information for professional, academic, or other associates who can attest to the student’s ability to be successful in a doctoral program.
    • One reference must be a current supervisor.
    • For the Principal, Superintendent, and Program Administrator certifications, a second reference must be an Executive/District Administrator.
  • Submit responses to the Admissions Statement Questions.
  • Provide proof of English proficiency according to established university policy.
  • Complete an interview with a member of the program faculty. Note: You will be contacted to schedule an interview once all of the application materials have been submitted.

The application for admission can be completed online and the applicant will then need to obtain official transcripts from previous institutions which should be sent directly to the admissions office at City University of Seattle. You will also need to complete the Doctor of Education in Leadership program admission packet.

Each applicant will then need to submit their resume/CV, references, and admissions statement.

Only when all of these items have been received will the interview with the program faculty be scheduled. Once the materials have been reviewed and the interview has been conducted, the program faculty will make a decision regarding program admission and notify the prospective student.

Applications are accepted throughout the year, and fully qualified applicants are admitted year-round on a first-come, first-served basis. All applications for fall quarter start must be received by September 20. Candidates will be interviewed and admissions decisions will be made as applications are received. Late applications are taken into consideration and handled on a space-available basis.

City University of Seattle’s Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) in Leadership equips professionals with the skills necessary to address the leadership challenges of today. This flexible, affordable and applied leadership program is designed to fit your career needs.

In this program, you have the opportunity to specialize in one of three concentration areas:

  • Organizational leadership
  • Higher educational leadership
  • Specialized study. Popular specialized study options include:
    • Inspired teacher leadership
    • Strategic innovation and decision making
    • Adult education and online learning
    • Nonprofit leadership
    • Global leadership
    • Entrepreneurship

Many students will have the option to transfer up to 12 graduate quarter credits from their accredited graduate degree programs. Some students with extensive experience in relevant content areas may also have the option to challenge up to 12 quarter credits in their concentration once they have demonstrated success as a doctoral student. Please talk to your advisor about these options.

Why Students Earn a Doctorate at CityU:

  • High student satisfaction: 92% of doctoral students surveyed are “satisfied” or “highly satisfied” with their overall student experience.
  • High retention rates: 87% of students stay in the program.
  • Regional accreditation: CityU’s doctoral program is recognized for its academic rigor, high-quality curriculum, and extensive student support.
  • Time to completion: You can complete your coursework in as few as two and half years if you are motivated and have graduate credits to transfer in. Ask an advisor for more info.
  • Competitive pricing: This doctoral program has been praised for its reasonably priced tuition.

Job Titles of Alumni with an Ed.D.

  • Dean
  • President
  • CEO
  • Executive Director
  • Superintendent

Get started today by contacting an advisor.

The Ed.D. program is accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU).

LDRD 600 - Introduction to Doctoral Program (1)
Students will become familiar with the CityU Doctoral Program, online success tips, and academic writing resources. Tutorials and short quizzes or exercises in scholastic honesty, writing conventions, and APA citations will help prepare students for doctoral-level work. This is a self-paced class.The Pre-Entry requirement is required but is not included in the program credits for degree completion.

LDRD 606 - Leadership Theories and Analysis (6)
This course explores seminal and contemporary leadership theories and the requirements of doctoral-level academic writing. Emphasis is placed on identifying appropriate scholarly sources, analyzing sources, integrating sources with one’s own experience to explain and defend positions, and presenting all in an intentional, structured, manner. This course is writing intensive. Students will complete this course with a knowledge of 10 theories of leadership and a clear understanding writing expectations at the doctoral level.LDRD 607 - Cultural Competence in a Diverse Society (3)
This course examines cultural diversity and its impact on people and organizations. Emphasis is placed on developing cultural competency, sensitivity, and awareness of difference and diversity. Students will analyze the opportunities and strategies of promoting diversity as an asset and resource in organizations.

LDRD 609 - Leading Organizational Change (3)
This course explores risks and opportunities for leaders to consider in the planning and management of organizational transitions. Emphasis is placed on analysis of uncertainty, internal and external politics, organizational culture adjustments, and communication of changes. Students will develop a comprehensive transition plan.

LDRD 613 - Socially and Environmentally Responsible Leadership (3)
This course explores social and environmental change opportunities for proactive leaders. Emphasis will be placed on the global impact of environmentally and socially responsible leadership. Students will be able to influence operational and financial decisions within an organization.

LDRD 630 - Ethical Organizational Leadership (3)
This course explores complex social, political, and global ethical challenges facing organizational leaders. Emphasis is placed on the implementation of organizational strategy founded in a value-based mission. Students will develop and communicate ethical leadership plans for organizational stakeholders to apply to everyday decisions.

LDRD 640 - Strategic Thinking (3)
This course explores how leaders develop strategic thinking in themselves and others. Emphasis is placed on stakeholder input; strategic intent and planning; evaluation of internal and external influences; and managing globally-minded, results-oriented strategic alliances. Students align strategies to an organization's mission and vision.

LDRD 646 - Developing Leaders of the Future (3)
This course focuses on developing ethical leaders of the future. Emphasis is placed on ethics, accountability, and empowerment through interdependent relationships with stakeholders. Students will be equipped to develop leaders of the future who can incorporate key initiatives into organizational strategies.

RESR 617 - Research Fundamentals (3)
This course will review the elements essential to a dissertation or research article. Emphasis is placed on scholarly writing, literature reviews, and statistical methods. Students will critically evaluate a research idea and formulate a hypothesis.RESR 619 - Quantitative Research Methods (3)
This course covers quantitative methods of data collection, including various types of surveys and experimental studies. Emphasis will be placed on different methodologies; validity, reliability and the formulation of research questions. Students will explore basic statistical tests used in quantitative methods.

RESR 621 - Qualitative Research Methods (3)
This course covers qualitative methods of data collection including interviews, content analysis and case studies. Emphasis will be placed on different methodologies, observation, and the formulation of research questions. Students will learn when it is appropriate to use qualitative research methods.

RESR 623 - Research Design (3)
In this course students will apply quantitative, qualitative, and mixed mode methodologies to research design. Emphasis will be placed on collecting, analyzing, interpreting, and reporting data in research studies. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to outline the requirements for a research study and write a methods section of an article, dissertation, or grant proposal. Prerequisite: RESR 619, RESR 621

RESR 625 - Advanced Research Topics (3)
Students will develop skills required to find, analyze, and synthesize literature pertaining to their dissertation's general research topic and/or specific research question. As preparation for their dissertation research, they will prepare a literature review and work on steps required to go through the dissertation process. Prerequisite: RESR 617, RESR 619, RESR 621

LDRD 682 - Comprehensive Exam (6)
The Comprehensive Exam for the leadership core will assess the student's knowledge of the field of leadership, as well as the ability to synthesize material and master concepts and theories. Successful completion of the comprehensive exam is required for degree completion.

RESR 694A - Dissertation 1 (3)
Each student will complete a prospectus that presents his/her proposed research idea, including the statement of the problem, its background and significance, a brief review of the literature, and a proposed methodology and research design to address the problem. This stage of the dissertation process is complete when the student's chair and committee member give approval.RESR 694B - Dissertation 2 (3)
Each student will complete a proposal that will become the detailed introduction, literature review, and methodology chapters of the dissertation. This stage of the dissertation process is complete when the student's committee, CityU doctoral dissertation director, and Institutional Review Board give approval.

RESR 694C - Dissertation 3 (3)
Each student will actively conduct research for the applied dissertation in leadership, analyze research findings, and write dissertation chapters on research findings and conclusion and discussion. The student will rework and revise based on committee feedback.

RESR 694D - Dissertation 4 (3)
Each student will actively conduct research for the applied dissertation in leadership, analyze research findings, and write dissertation chapters on research findings and conclusion and discussion. The student will rework and revise based on committee feedback.

RESR 694E - Dissertation 5 (3)
Each student will actively conduct research for the applied dissertation in leadership, analyze research findings, and write dissertation chapters on research findings and conclusion and discussion. The student will rework and revise based on committee feedback.

RESR 694F - Dissertation 6 (3)
Each student will formally submit and orally defend the applied dissertation in leadership, as well as prepare sections for dissemination. This stage of the dissertation process is complete when the student's dissertation chair, committee member, university research reviewer, and doctoral program director give approval.

RESR 99 - Continuing Dissertation Services (0)
Students who do not complete their dissertation within the program's allotted timeframe must register for Continuing Dissertation Services each quarter until they have completed all of the milestones and are ready to take RESR 694F - Defense and Dissemination.

Residencies are one or two-day campus experiences that help prepare you for various phases of the doctoral program and dissertation. While you are encouraged to attend residencies in person, an online option is available. Residencies are offered on campus in Seattle during the summer quarter and in San Diego during the winter quarter.RESR 601 - Residency 1 (1)
The first residency will focus on the skills needed to begin development of the Problem Statement, Purpose Statement, and Research Question sections of the Dissertation Prospectus.

RESR 602 - Residency 2 (1)
The second residency will focus on the skills needed for composing literature reviews and methods sections of an applied dissertation in leadership.

RESR 603 - Residency 3 (1)
The third residency will focus on the skills needed to prepare the findings and conclusions of the student's dissertation. Students will also plan for their defense and explore strategies for dissemination.

Concentration Area (24)

The Organizational Leadership concentration prepares current and future leaders to meet the challenges facing their organizations in a complex globalized workplace. Areas within the concentration teach leaders the skills they will need to generate trust, empower others, and implement innovative and strategic solutions. Through scholarly research, students will apply theoretical leadership models with collaborative decision-making to promote ethical and sustainable organizations. A broad knowledge of systems-thinking will prepare students to lead diverse organizational change that uses internal and external resources through stakeholder collaboration.LDRD 632 - Collaborative Coaching (3)
This course explores the use of coaching models to improve individual and group professional development, evaluation of goal attainment, and methods to promote career-oriented empowerment and motivation. Emphasis is placed on coaching models that prepare leaders to be effective change agents. Students will attain tools and strategies to coach colleagues and followers in their pursuit of personal and professional goal achievement.

LDRD 634 - Leading in a Global Environment (3)
This course explores challenges faced by leaders in globally-connected organizations. Emphasis is placed on cross-cultural training, diverse communication strategies, and relationship building. Students examine the changing nature of international leadership, recognize the benefits of international business relationships, and evaluate opportunities global leadership provides for sustaining organizational operations.

LDRD 642 - Organizational Design and Culture (3)
This course explores the complexities of organizational design and how specific design features complement and enhance organizational decision-making, use of information, problem-solving, accountability, empowerment, and other elements of organizational behavior. Emphasis is placed on identifying the elements of organizational culture and the strategic application of organizational design to ensure alignment with desired behaviors and culture. Students will design an organization to support specific organization-wide behaviors and culture.

LDRD 644 - Managing Complexity in Organizations (3)
This course focuses on systems thinking approaches to understand and analyze self-organizing adaptive organizations. Emphasis is placed on communication, implementation, and measurement of change in complex adaptive systems. Students will be able to capitalize on organizational chaos and complexity to promote globally sustainable decision-making and planning.

Graduate Electives or Transfer Credits (12)
Graduate level transfer credits must meet the GPA transfer requirements of 3.0 or B grade or higher.

The Higher Education concentration prepares graduates for leadership roles within colleges and universities, in particular in student development, academic support, academic leadership, and administration. Students will expand leadership skills to direct higher education programs, institutions, and agencies through analysis, self-reflection, and best practical application in the workplace. This concentration also provides broad knowledge of social, political, and economic forces at work in society as they relate to higher education institutions. Students become informed leaders through the utilization of scholarly research and theoretical models applied to experiential situations.LDRD 654 - Legal Issues in Higher Education (3)
Higher education leaders around the world need to have a clear understanding of the legal and ethical obligations that their institutions have to their students and other stakeholders. Emphasis will be placed on human resource issues including faculty employment decisions, issues relating to student protections, institutional obligations, and due process. Students will identify the legal issues involved in academic and institutional administrative matters and be able to factor due process and defensible solutions into decisions.

LDRD 657 - Academic Governance and Resource Allocation (3)
This course analyzes the models of academic governance and the economic factors that govern resource allocation decisions in today's colleges and universities. Students will examine the various models of academic governance and their origins, as well evaluate their impact on a higher education institution's financial policies and resource allocation decisions.

LDRD 662 - Student Populations and Experiences (3)
This course explores student populations and how students experience the higher education institution. Emphasis is placed on applying student development theory across the diversity of student populations to gain a deep understanding of the student experience. Students will evaluate how higher education changes students.

LDRD 664 - The Future of Higher Education (3)
This course explores what higher education may look like in the next 5, 10, and 50 years. Emphasis is placed on evaluating current trends and predicting where they may go in the future. Students will critically evaluate the future role of technology in higher education.

Graduate Electives or Transfer Credits (12)
Graduate level transfer credits must meet the GPA transfer requirements of 3.0 or B grade or higher.

The Specialized Study concentration allows students to frame a degree focus in a specific area consistent with their current or anticipated field of interest or specialization. Students will develop the skills they need to generate trust, empower others, and implement innovative and strategic solutions in their field of concentration, demonstrating academic rigor and scholarly research throughout their course of study.Students can build on any prior graduate focus, augmented with courses from the several doctoral concentrations and from other CityU master's programs to best design their proposed course of study. Popular specialized study options include:

  • Inspired teacher leadership
  • Strategic innovation and decision making
  • Adult education and online learning
  • Nonprofit leadership
  • Global leadership

Students work with their advisors to identify the courses required for the specialized study concentration and document the rationale for the selections; this concentration proposal is subject to approval by the dean.

A Q&A with Dr. Joel Domingo, Academic Program Director and Associate Professor

Q: What are your areas of expertise and why would it be important to students?

A: I have a long history of leadership and teaching in several educational, community, and civic organizations and as such, my work has focused on helping people develop leadership capacities in their various contexts. My expertise is in the area of educational and non-profit leadership, school and community collaboration, program evaluation, and transformational leadership. As CityU prepares graduates to be change agents in this world, knowing and understanding the dynamics of leadership and collaboration are vital to that end, and I’m humbled that I can align some of my background with the vision of the school.

Q: Why do you enjoy teaching at CityU?

A: CityU represents a population of students that I believe are the best-motivated – the adult learners, who have responsibilities beyond school such as work and perhaps family commitments. Learning to balance all those dynamics while pursuing a degree is inspirational to me. Furthermore, it’s a population that I can personally relate to as I myself was an adult learner through graduate school.

Q: What colleges did you attend and what degrees have you earned?

A: I have a bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of Washington, a master’s degree in theology from Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, CA, and a Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership from Argosy University.

Q: What courses do you teach and/or have you taught?

A: Several of the core leadership courses including, “Developing Leaders of the Future.” I also teach the nonprofit, higher education leadership, and introduction to doctoral study courses.

Q: What might you tell a student who was thinking of taking one of your classes?

A: I would let them know my goal as an instructor is not just to help them learn the material, but to also facilitate an experience where they see the material come to life and can immediately apply their learning to their particular setting.

Q: List your pertinent honors or awards received.

A: Fellowship at the Center for Human Development & Disability (University of Washington) to do research on the intersection of education, family, and disability

President’s Club Award (Argosy University) for one of the best academic administrators in the entire campus system

Diplomat of the Year (Seattle Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce) a civic engagement award

Q: What are your career highlights and professional positions?

A: My background encompasses K-12, higher education, nonprofit, and civic spaces. I have served in a faculty and administrative role at several local colleges including the University of Washington, Seattle Pacific University, Regent College, and Northwest University. I also had the unique opportunity to serve for a time in the Washington State Governor’s Office where I helped lead community educational advocacy and policy efforts across the state. In addition, I sit or have sat on several boards including the Strategic Planning Task Force and Special Education Advocacy and Advisory Committee for Seattle Public Schools, the Consumer Advisory Council of the University of Washington Center for Human Development and Disability, the Washington State Commission on Asian Pacific American Affairs Education Committee, the Seattle Special Education PTSA, the Washington State Charter Schools Association, and the Haring Center/Experimental Education Unit, a school dedicated to creating a positive educational experience for children of all abilities.

Q: What have you published?

A: I wrote a chapter in the one of volumes of the “Proven Practices in Higher Education” series where I highlighted the supportive practices that help adult students succeed. I’ve gotten a chance to also present this topic at conferences. I was also guest commentator in a Seattle Times article on family engagement in education.

Q: What are your personal interests?

A: Spending time with my family, anything in the sci-fi and nerd universe, and football – the kind with the round ball, otherwise known as soccer to us Americans. Go Sounders!

Q: Any fond CityU memories you can share?

A: Being a longtime resident, I have observed CityU grow from its humble beginnings here in Seattle to become a well-respected international presence in higher education. All along the way, I have encountered numerous CityU graduates who are leaders in their fields and always thought to myself, “I would love to be a part of that community someday.”

Leader Greg PriceA Q&A with Dr. Greg Price, Associate Dean

Q: What is your terminal degree in and where did you get it from?
A: My terminal degree is an Ed.D. in Organizational Leadership from City University of Seattle.

Q: What do you do for fun?
A: When I’m not teaching, administering, and updating the financials in a business I own, I enjoy learning – especially in topics related to cryptography and entrepreneurship. While those may be indoor activities, my outdoor activities that I enjoy are to work in the gardens at home, remodel structures around the house, walk the neighborhood, catch and eat fish, and doing all these activities enjoying different IPA beers.

Q: What classes do you teach?
A: I currently teach business, economics, communication, and leadership courses. I also am a certified facilitator for DiSC Workplace training.

Q: Why did you decide to start teaching?
A: It was a calling and it is a way to give back. I have learned much from the careers I have had the opportunity to experience in five different industries. Each supported a developing leadership style in different ways.

Q: Why do you enjoy teaching at CityU?
A: CityU provides me with the needed structure and also the necessary autonomy I desire. Also, students bring so much to the classroom that the learning never stops.

Q: What’s one thing you always tell your students that may or may not relate to your class?
A: There is no ‘one’ thing that I will relate to any class. I will share stories, but they are shared if they contribute to the discussions in the classroom.

Q: What might you tell a student who was thinking of taking one of your classes?
A: Jump in. You’ll enjoy the learning and the process. My role as an instructor is to include everyone and respect everyone’s position. I do encourage students to think critically within the discussion boards. Looking at someone’s perspectives from a different lens helps you, the student, to clarify your own lens, but to also help others see perspectives that they may not have viewed before.

Q: What is something you’ve learned from end-of-course evaluations that you applied later on?
A: I encourage everyone to support the growth of their professor by asking students to complete the end of course evaluations. I have learned from previous students the following makes a difference for them: being consistent with grading and feedback, having quick turn-around times for grading, and helping students ‘see’ what is happening in their papers.

leadership faculty SALA Q&A with Dr. Pressley Rankin IV, Academic Program Director

Q: What is your terminal degree in and where did you get it from?

A: PhD in Leadership from the University of San Diego.

Q: What do you do for fun?

A: I enjoy reading and watching science fiction and fantasy.

Q: What classes do you teach?

A: Research courses, Strategic Thinking, Adult Education and Online Learning, and Organizational Leadership courses.

Q: Why did you decide to start teaching?

A: I have a passion for developing students’ ideas into research and ultimately to help them obtain new knowledge in their fields.

Q: Why do you enjoy teaching at CityU?

A: Our online program has a great structure that allows students to learn from multiple sources. As a professor, it is fun learning new ways to reach out to students online.

Q: What’s one thing you always tell your students that may or may not relate to your class?

A: Your education is in your hands. Do the readings, participate in the discussions, learn from your professor and your peers. The sky is the limit on what you can learn.

Q: Any fond CityU memories that you can share?

I really love our summer international programs that bring students from all over the world to CityU to learn. The cultural diversity and international student perspectives are amazing.

Q: What might you tell a student who was thinking of taking one of your classes?

A: Read your syllabus…really, it is all in there.

Q: What is something that you have learned from end-of-course evaluations that you applied later on?

A: It is always helpful to me to get students’ feedback on what is working in class and what doesn’t work. I have re-done assignments and re-evaluated readings based on feedback from students.

A Q&A with Dr. Nicole Ferry, Associate Program Director

Q: What is your terminal degree in and where did you get it from?

A: Cultural Studies and Social Thought in Education, PhD – Washington State University

Q: What do you do for fun?

A: Bowling, going to the race track, rock climbing, playing with my puppies

Q: What classes do you teach?

A: Qualitative Research Methods, Cultural Competence in a Diverse Society

Q: Why did you decide to start teaching?

A: I needed a job . I started teaching as a graduate assistant at Washington State University. I thought I would hate it because public speaking was not my strength. Turned out to be my favorite academic activity!

Q: Why do you enjoy teaching at CityU?

A: I like working with adult learners. The students are dedicated and often go beyond the course material to expand their learning!

Q: What’s one thing you always tell your students that may or may not relate to your class?

A: I care about APA formatting. A lot.

Q: Any fond CityU memories that you can share?

A: My favorite memory (so far) has been working with students, in-person, at the residencies. It was so great to meet all the students and brainstorm with them dissertation topics, research methods, and so on. Plus, there’s free food at the residencies!

Q: What might you tell a student who was thinking of taking one of your classes?

A: Effort is important to me. If you don’t always get things right, that’s not my concern. It’s that I can see you’re working to better understand the material, you’re dedicated to turning in well-written and thoughtful assignments, and that you engage with me and your peers in an open, inclusive, and respectful manner. If you can handle that, you can take my course!

Q: What is something you’ve learned from end-of-course evaluations that you applied later on?

A: Students love instructor videos. They say it helps clarify both course expectations and content. It surprised me because my production quality is less than stellar. But I will continue to make them and give the people what they want!

A Q&A with Academic Program Director Dr. Marge Chow

Q: What is your terminal degree in and where did you get it from?

A: EdD in School Administration, Seattle University.

Q: What do you do for fun?

A: Travel, reading, walking outdoors, time with grand-kids, dinner/lunch with friends, movies, window shopping, spectator sports (Seahawks, Mariners, Sounders, Huskies).

Q: What classes do you teach?

A: Educational and executive leadership courses.

Q: Why did you decide to start teaching?

A: I always wanted to be a teacher like my sister. I had fun helping her prepare materials for her classes and classroom. She was a great inspiration.

Q: Why do you enjoy teaching at CityU?

A: The personalization, support, and flexibility provides an environment of caring and concern.

Q: What is one thing that you always tell your students that may or may not relate to your class?

A: Aloha! I’m originally from Maui. The Hawaiian word ohana means family and that’s what I strive for with each student in the program.

Q: Any fond CityU memories that you can share?

A: Having the opportunity to work in the City U sponsored education program at the Department of Education in Hawaii where every student was a first-time college grad in their individual ohana (family).

Q: What might you tell a student who was thinking of taking one of your classes?

A: Model the essential dispositions of a leader you hope to become.

Q: What is something you’ve learned from end-of-course evaluations that you applied later on?

A: Communicate often!

A Q&A with Dr. Paul Gerhardt, Associate Faculty

Q: What are your areas of expertise and why would it be important to students?

A: I have numerous areas that I have developed expertise in, including: leadership, diversity, cultural competence, management, marketing and human resources.

Q: Why do you enjoy teaching at CityU?

A: City University of Seattle attracts a higher caliber of students than many other institutions. They are generally dedicated to working hard, digging deeper and committed to doing high quality work that builds our reputation of excellence.

Q: What colleges did you attend and what degrees have you earned?

A: Capella University: PhD Management and Organizational Behaviors with a focus in Leadership

Chapman University: MA Organizational Leadership and Human Resource Management

The Evergreen State College: BA Business, Leadership, Prelaw, and Systems Thinking

Q: What courses do you teach and/or have you taught?

A: MAL 560 Global Leadership

LDRD 607 Cultural Competence in a Diversity Society

LDRD 636 Leading Diverse Teams

LDRD 634 Cultural Communication

Q: What might you tell a student who was thinking of taking one of your classes?

A: Be ready to grow! Keep an open mind. Dig deep into the literature and support your ideas well with lots of ideas from experts found in our library databases. Become an expert through engagement and thoughtful consideration! Have fun with learning. Choose to be the best you can. This is the place to create your future!

Q: List your pertinent honors or awards received.

A: 2015 United States Army Recognition for Diversity and Inclusion training facilitation

2007 BECU Leadership Development Recognition for Training

2008 WAVA Educator of the Year

1998 All-Washington Academic Team Award

Q: What are your career highlights and professional positions?

A: Tenured Faculty and Program District Director/Program Coordinator for Pierce College Business Management, Marketing and Accounting programs

Doctoral Mentor and Adjunct Professor Brandman University

CEO of The Organizational Doctor Training and Development Company

Author of several leadership and diversity books including Diversity At Work and Emotional Intelligence.

Q: What have you published?

A: Emotional Intelligence, Time Management,Diversity At Work, The Diversity King, Leadership Lucy

Q: What are your personal interests?

A: I love expanding my knowledge in leadership, diversity, teams, culture, communications and management.

Q: Any fond CityU memories you can share?

A: I get to work with graduate students who often quickly learn to embrace academic research then take that research to new levels in my classes by synthesizing what they find to create new and brilliant insights for everyone engaged in our intellectual feast.

All admitted students will take an online orientation class before the start of their first quarter in doctoral classes. During this orientation, students will learn more about the program. The orientation class will cover online course delivery basics, academic writing expectations, and the research skills needed for success. Students will also participate in online discussions, complete an orientation research assignment, receive tips for overall program success, and interact with faculty and classmates.
The Ed.D. program is offered entirely online with the option to attend the residency experience in Seattle during the summer quarter or in San Diego during the winter quarter.

Throughout the program, students will complete three residency requirements either on campus or online. In addition to coursework, residencies help students with various writing and research skills needed for success in the program. Residencies are offered on campus in Seattle in the summer and San Diego in the winter.The first residency will focus on the skills needed to begin doctoral level research and writing, including the development of the Problem Statement, Purpose Statement, and Research Question sections of the Dissertation Prospectus.

The second residency will focus on the skills needed for composing literature reviews and methods sections of an applied dissertation in leadership.

The third residency will focus on the skills needed to prepare the findings and conclusions of the student’s dissertation. Students will also understand the requirements for their defense and explore strategies for dissemination.

Tuition Cost

Learn more about tuition and fees for our undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral programs.

Financial Aid Opportunities

At CityU, we’re committed to helping students achieve their academic goals no matter their economic situations. Our financial aid counselors are here to find the resources you need to pay for your education, including grants, loans, work study, and scholarships.

Learn more about financial aid opportunities at CityU, or contact our Financial Aid Team at 800.426.5596, 206.239.4540, or finaid@cityu.edu.

Military Tuition Benefits

As a Yellow Ribbon school, CityU is proud to serve those who have served in the military. We offer military tuition discounts for active-duty servicemembers and their spouses and accept military benefits such as the Post 9/11 GI Bill® and Tuition Assistance.

Learn more about military tuition benefits, VA benefits, and military partnership programs designed to help you reach your military and career goals.

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