Make a Difference by Teaching the Future

City University of Seattle’s Bachelor of Arts in Education degree provides a route for first-time bachelor’s students to become certified teachers. You can complete the BA in education on its own or combine it with any of the following emphasis areas, some of which can be combined to create dual endorsements.

The BA Education program was created with flexibility in mind. Choose from online coursework, Saturday classes, or mixed-mode delivery to fit your classes around your schedule. Each mode of instruction will provide you with more hands-on field experience than traditional teacher certification programs, ensuring you’re better prepared for the realities of today’s classrooms. The program can be completed in two years.

The Bachelor of Arts in Education will satisfy requirements for a Washington State Residency Teaching Certificate, which means you’ll be qualified to work as a certified teacher in any public or private elementary school in Washington state.

Endorsements include:

  • Elementary Education
  • Middle-Level Mathematics
  • Special Education
  • English Language Learners (ELL)
  • Reading

Admissions Requirements

To start the Bachelor of Arts in Education, you must first complete your lower-division requirements, pass the Washington Educator Skills Test-Basic® (WEST-B), and then apply with our advisors. CityU is dedicated to helping you achieve your goal of becoming an elementary school teacher.

Accreditation

CityU’s Albright School of Education is accredited by the Washington State Professional Educator Standards Board and has a long history as one of the foremost teaching schools in Washington state.

Learning Outcomes

Throughout the Bachelor of Arts in Education program, you’ll learn:

  • How to address the needs of students with disabilities in your classroom
  • Teaching the social sciences while establishing opportunities for direct classroom application
  • The basic elements, principles, related concepts, and vocabulary of the creative arts
  • The potential empowering or limiting effects of health/fitness choices
  • Theoretical perspectives on mathematics education
  • Public school law with an emphasis on the rights and responsibilities of students and teachers
  • Quality instructional design and delivery
  • Inquiry-based approach to teaching STEM
  • Theories and practice of classroom management

There are several endorsements within the Bachelor of Arts in Education that you can choose to study. Each pathway will lead you toward becoming a certified teacher.

Lower-Division Requirements (90)

College Composition: 5 credits
College Mathematics: 5 credits
Humanities: 15 credits
Social Science: 15 credits
Natural Science/Mathematics: 15 credits

B.A. in Education (180)

Combined Requirements

EDE 307

Special Education and Special Programs (3)

This course provides general education teachers with the knowledge and skills to address the needs of students with disabilities in their classrooms. The course also surveys other special programs including ESL/Bilingual, gifted education, and federal, state, and local compensatory programs and services. The course offers a holistic perspective of the range of human experience of special needs students, attitudes of individuals and society toward these individuals, and strategies for building a sense of classroom community to engage all students in meeting academic and interpersonal goals. In addition, this course provides opportunities for learning about collaborative models for involving families as well as other professionals in planning for students with special needs. Participants use role playing, observation, interviewing, and group investigations to learn about interventions and accommodations appropriate for K-8 students with special needs.

EDE 325

Sustainability and the Social Sciences (4)

This course focuses on a project-based approach to teaching the social sciences while establishing opportunities for direct classroom application and transformative student learning. Emphasis is placed on the integration of the social, ecological and economic dimensions of sustainability. Candidates learn to incorporate project-based pedagogy theory and practice and how best to implement them into classroom instruction.

EDE 370A

Content: Creative Arts Concepts (2)

This course focuses on the basic elements, principles, related concepts, and vocabulary of the creative arts. Emphasis is placed on developing the candidate's familiarity with a variety of art forms and how to integrate them into inter-disciplinary lesson plans and unit plans. Candidates will be able to effectively integrate the arts into planning academic curricula for K-8 classrooms.

EDE 403

Health and Fitness Methods (2)

This course provides an understanding of the potential empowering or limiting effects of health/fitness choices and habits on quality of life, health, and lifespan. Areas of study include exploration into health-related topics as well as candidate development of teaching skills necessary for effective health education and application of physical activities that promote fitness in the K-8 student learning environment.

EDE 433

Content: Mathematics I (4)

EDE 433 is the first of two courses that examine theoretical perspectives on mathematics education and methods of teaching and learning mathematics at the elementary and middle school levels. Candidates acquire and demonstrate practical experience in the understanding of the mathematics concepts and methods taught in grades K-8. In this course, candidates investigate various teaching strategies to motivate children, explore what it means to know and do mathematics, to solve problems, to use assessment to inform instruction, and to teach math equitably to all children.

EDE 439

Content: Mathematics II (4)

EDE 439 is the second of two math methods courses that examine theoretical perspectives on mathematics education and methods of teaching and learning mathematics at the elementary and middle school levels. Candidates acquire and demonstrate practical experience in the understanding of the mathematics concepts and methods taught in grades K-8. In this second course, candidates investigate various teaching strategies to motivate students, explore what it means to know and do mathematics, to solve problems, to use assessment to inform instruction, and to teach math equitably to all children.

EDU 308

American School Law and Issues in Special Populations (3)

This course examines public school law with an emphasis on the rights and responsibilities of students and teachers. Candidates analyze current issues and case studies specific to public education, special education and the education of recent immigrants for positive inclusion in a public school. Candidates learn professional boundaries, procedures, and resources to maintain a safe environment for teaching and learning.

EDU 313

Multicultural Education (2)

This course provides an introduction to the diversity of the American school population and the concepts, theories, and strategies that constitute multicultural education. Participants explore how children from diverse backgrounds construct knowledge within the contexts of their own socio-cultural backgrounds and how such diversity affects how the students are perceived in the classroom. Issues such as equity, race, ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, language, disability, and other special circumstances are explored. This course promotes the candidate’s sensitivity, acceptance, and ability to self-reflect in regards to issues related to diversity and inspires the candidate to do the same with his/her students.

EDU 320A

Content: Instructional Strategies P-12 (5)

This course examines the basic principles of quality instructional design and delivery. Topics include personalized learning as well as instructional strategies that promote learning experiences and enable both teacher and student to monitor learning progress. Candidates develop foundational understandings of how to prepare to teach a class when they have their own classrooms.

EDU 329

Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (4)

This course guides teacher certification candidates to demonstrate competency in inquiry-based approach to teaching STEM that emphasizes problem-solving and hands-on learning. Participants apply the cycle of inquiry to the essential components of science, technology, engineering and math: concepts, knowledge, understanding, skills, reasoning, product development and dispositions. The course provides opportunities for direct classroom application and transformative student learning.

EDU 383A

Content: Classroom Management (3)

This course is an introduction to theories and practice of classroom management. Emphasis is placed on candidate practice of skills and strategies necessary to establish and maintain classroom communities that will support student learning and human relationships.

ERL 436

Literacy Instruction and Assessment I (4)

This is the first of three courses in the literacy sequence for the undergraduate Teacher Certification Program. This course provides a foundation for literacy instruction. Topics include reading and writing instruction, response to literature, language acquisition, construction of meaning/comprehension, and strategies for English language learners. Candidates learn strategies for literacy instruction which can be used with all learners. Prerequisite: Per program plan, plan of study or approval of permission of program director

ERL 438

Literacy Instruction and Assessment II (4)

The second of three courses in the literacy sequence for the undergraduate Teacher Certification Program, this course examines a variety of assessment and instructional strategies. Topics include reading comprehension strategies, informational text, complex text, text density, writing and alignment with state standards. Upon completion of this course, candidates are able to effectively assess and teach literacy skills for K-8 students. Course Entry Requirement: Admission to BA in Education program. Course Entry Recommended: ERL 436.

ERL 440

Language Arts and Literacy Integration (4)

This is the last of three courses in the literacy sequence for the undergraduate evidence, evaluate interventions and become an effective researcher. Overall, the systematic collection of data is used to document positive impact on student learning. Note: Please see note on ERL 508.

ESP 423

Curriculum Modifications and Adaptation (2)

This course provides educators with the pedagogical foundations, strategies, and understanding to successfully modify and provide curriculum adaptations within the learning environment for the special needs of exceptional students. Course work and class activities includes topics on classroom arrangements, adaptive equipment, grouping, scheduling, homework materials selection, classroom management accommodations, effective delivery, and adaptation of subject content, as well as ways to foster student social competence and self-determination.

— CHOOSE 1 OF THE FOLLOWING —

EDU 404A

Content: Student Assessment and Evaluation (3)

This course is a required foundations course for all candidates in the Bachelor of Arts in Education Teacher Preparation Program. The course focuses on the usage of assessment in educational decision making as well as formative and summative classroom assessment and the necessary foundations, strategies, and understandings to assess and evaluation student learning and promote student self-assessment. Emphasis is placed on the skills necessary to make data-driven decisions and how these decisions impact instruction, curriculum, and services. Practical application of this knowledge will enable the candidate to use assessment in making placement and instructional decisions as well as assist students in the classroom in monitoring and assess their own learning. Prerequisite: Per program plan or plan of study

ESP 408

Student Assessment and Evaluation (3)

This course focuses on the necessary foundations, strategies, and understanding to successfully perform assessments and evaluations in the classroom for placement and implementation of programs for students receiving special education services. Emphasis is placed on the selection of appropriate assessment and evaluation tools, timelines and the interrelationship between assessment components. Candidates demonstrate selection of appropriate assessment tool and accurately interpret data used in the assessment process for qualification and implementation of individual programs for students receiving special education services.

Elementary Education (180)

In addition to the following required courses, students must take 21 additional upper divisional electives

Elementary Education Core Requirements

EDE 307

Special Education and Special Programs (3)

This course provides general education teachers with the knowledge and skills to address the needs of students with disabilities in their classrooms. The course also surveys other special programs including ESL/bilingual, gifted education, and federal, state, and local compensatory programs and services. The course offers a holistic perspective of the range of human experience of special needs students, attitudes of individuals and society toward these individuals, and strategies for building a sense of classroom community to engage all students in meeting academic and interpersonal goals. In addition, this course provides opportunities for learning about collaborative models for involving families as well as other professionals in planning for students with special needs. Participants use role playing, observation, interviewing, and group investigations to learn about interventions and accommodations appropriate for K-8 students with special needs.

EDE 325

Sustainability and the Social Sciences (4)

This course focuses on a project-based approach to teaching the social sciences while establishing opportunities for direct classroom application and transformative student learning. Emphasis is placed on the integration of the social, ecological, and economic dimensions of sustainability. Candidates learn to incorporate project-based pedagogy theory and practice and how best to implement them into classroom instruction.

EDE 370A

Content: Creative Arts Concepts (2)

This course focuses on the basic elements, principles, related concepts, and vocabulary of the creative arts. Emphasis is placed on developing the candidate's familiarity with a variety of art forms and how to integrate them into inter-disciplinary lesson plans and unit plans. Candidates will be able to effectively integrate the arts into planning academic curricula for K-8 classrooms.

EDE 403

Health and Fitness Methods (2)

This course provides an understanding of the potential empowering or limiting effects of health/fitness choices and habits on quality of life, health and lifespan. Topics include exploration into health-related topics as well as candidate development of teaching skills necessary for effective health education and application of physical activities that promote fitness in the K-8 student learning environment.

Combined Requirements

EDE 433

Content: Mathematics I (4)

EDE 433 is the first of two courses that examine theoretical perspectives on mathematics education and methods of teaching and learning mathematics at the elementary and middle school levels. Candidates acquire and demonstrate practical experience in the understanding of the mathematics concepts and methods taught in grades K-8. In this course, candidates investigate various teaching strategies to motivate children, explore what it means to know and do mathematics, to solve problems, to use assessment to inform instruction, and to teach math equitably to all children.

EDE 439

Content: Mathematics II (4)

EDE 439 is the second of two math methods courses that examine theoretical perspectives on mathematics education and methods of teaching and learning mathematics at the elementary and middle school levels. Candidates acquire and demonstrate practical experience in the understanding of the mathematics concepts and methods taught in grades K-8. In this second course, candidates investigate various teaching strategies to motivate students, explore what it means to know and do mathematics, to solve problems, to use assessment to inform instruction, and to teach math equitably to all children.

EDU 308

American School Law and Issues in Special Populations (3)

This course examines public school law with an emphasis on the rights and responsibilities of students and teachers. Candidates analyze current issues and case studies specific to public education, special education and the education of recent immigrants for positive inclusion in a public school. Candidates learn professional boundaries, procedures, and resources to maintain a safe environment for teaching and learning.

EDU 313

Multicultural Education (2)

This course provides an introduction to the diversity of the American school population and the concepts, theories, and strategies that constitute multicultural education. Participants explore how children from diverse backgrounds construct knowledge within the contexts of their own socio-cultural backgrounds and how such diversity affects how the students are perceived in the classroom. Issues such as equity, race, ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, language, disability, and other special circumstances are explored. This course promotes the candidate’s sensitivity, acceptance, and ability to self-reflect in regards to issues related to diversity and inspires the candidate to do the same with his/her students.

EDU 320A

Content: Instructional Strategies P-12 (5)

This course examines the basic principles of quality instructional design and delivery. Topics include personalized learning as well as instructional strategies that promote learning experiences and enable both teacher and student to monitor learning progress. Candidates develop foundational understandings of how to prepare to teach a class when they have their own classrooms.

EDU 329

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (4)

This course guides teacher certification candidates to demonstrate competency in inquiry-based approach to teaching STEM that emphasizes problem-solving and hands-on learning. Participants apply the cycle of inquiry to the essential components of science, technology, engineering and math: concepts, knowledge, understanding, skills, reasoning, product development and dispositions. The course provides opportunities for direct classroom application and transformative student learning.

EDU 383A

Content: Classroom Management (3)

This course is an introduction to theories and practice of classroom management. Emphasis is placed on candidate practice of skills and strategies necessary to establish and maintain classroom communities that will support student learning and human relationships.

EDU 404A

Content: Student Assessment and Evaluation (3)

This course is a required foundations course for all candidates in the Bachelor of Arts in Education Teacher Preparation Program. The course focuses on the usage of assessment in educational decision making as well as formative and summative classroom assessment and the necessary foundations, strategies, and understandings to assess and evaluation student learning and promote student self-assessment. Emphasis is placed on the skills necessary to make data-driven decisions and how these decisions impact instruction, curriculum, and services. Practical application of this knowledge will enable the candidate to use assessment in making placement and instructional decisions as well as assist students in the classroom in monitoring and assess their own learning. Prerequisite: Per program plan or plan of study

EDU 495

Positive Impact on Student Learning: Project (1)

As a requirement for completion of degree and certification requirements, in this course the candidate completes an impact on student learning project based on a unit of study developed and taught in conjunction with the Teacher Performance Assessment. Candidates participate in seminars, workshops and conferences designed to promote quality evidence and timely completion of the project. Each presentation is reviewed by faculty as evidence of the candidate's effectiveness in impacting student learning. Prerequisite: Pass state required endorsement test(s) and departmental approval.

ERL 436

Literacy Instruction and Assessment I (4)

This is the first of three courses in the literacy sequence for the undergraduate Teacher Certification Program. This course provides a foundation for literacy instruction. Topics include reading and writing instruction, response to literature, language acquisition, construction of meaning/comprehension, and strategies for English language learners. Candidates learn strategies for literacy instruction which can be used with all learners. Prerequisite: Per program plan, plan of study or approval of permission of program director

ERL 438

Literacy Instruction and Assessment II (4)

The second of three courses in the literacy sequence for the undergraduate Teacher Certification Program, this course examines a variety of assessment and instructional strategies. Topics include reading comprehension strategies, informational text, complex text, text density, writing and alignment with state standards. Upon completion of this course, candidates are able to effectively assess and teach literacy skills for K-8 students. Course Entry Requirement: Admission to BA in Education program. Course Entry Recommended: ERL 436.

ERL 440

Language Arts and Literacy Integration (4)

This is the last of three courses in the literacy sequence for the undergraduate evidence, evaluate interventions and become an effective researcher. Overall, the systematic collection of data is used to document positive impact on student learning. Note: Please see note on ERL 508.

ESP 423

Curriculum Modifications and Adaptation (2)

This course provides educators with the pedagogical foundations, strategies, and understanding to successfully modify and provide curriculum adaptations within the learning environment for the special needs of exceptional students. Course work and class activities includes topics on classroom arrangements, adaptive equipment, grouping, scheduling, homework materials selection, classroom management accommodations, effective delivery, and adaptation of subject content, as well as ways to foster student social competence and self-determination.

Internship and Student Teaching

EDU 349

September Experience (1)

In this September Experience, candidates complete the required number of days in a school classroom with guidance from a cooperating mentor teacher and field supervisor. Topics include essential dispositions and skills in planning for instruction, engaging students, and assessing learning. Completion of this introductory internship provides candidates the field-based perspectives and reflection skills needed to understand the tasks the teacher completes prior to students starting school and during the first weeks of the school year. Prerequisite: Preferred completion of the first two field internships unless approved by Director of Teacher Certification Programs.

EDU 350

Introduction to Field Experience (1)

This course focuses on acquainting students with the resources, documents and peer-interaction skills they will use throughout their educational program. Emphasis is placed on becoming familiar with available professional resources, essential professional dispositions and collaboration skills. Practical application of this knowledge will assist students in successfully accessing needed resources during their educational program and developing professional competency.

EDU 351

Internship I (1)

In this first field experience, candidates complete the required number of days in a school classroom with guidance of a cooperating teacher and field supervisor. Topics include essential dispositions and skills in planning for instruction, engaging students, and assessing learning. Completion of this introductory internship provides candidates field-based perspectives and reflection skills needed to improve performance in this and following field experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to the Bachelor of Arts in Education Program or permission of the Director

EDU 352

Internship II (1)

In this second developmental field experience, candidates complete the required number of days of internship in a school classroom with guidance of a cooperating teacher and a field supervisor. Topics include classroom duties; establishing a learning environment; working with individual students, small groups, and the whole-class; collaborative planning, instruction, and assessment; evidence of student learning; and developing collaboration and problem-solving skills. To build capacity regarding residency endorsement competencies, candidates plan and teach lessons or activities, journal reflectively about teaching and learning, pursue a professional development goal based in field performance, and reflect on practice. Prerequisite: Admission to the Bachelor of Arts in Education Program or permission of the Director, and completion of Internship I or equivalent

EDU 353

Internship III (1)

In this third developmental field experience, candidates complete the required number of days of internship in a school classroom with guidance of a cooperating teacher and a field supervisor. Related topics include establishing a learning environment; collaborative planning, instruction, and assessment; evidence of student learning; and developing collaboration and problem-solving skills. To build capacity regarding residency endorsement competencies, candidates plan and teach lessons or activities, journal reflectively about teaching and learning, pursue a professional development goal based in field performance, and reflect on practice. Prerequisite: Admission to the Bachelor of Arts in Education Program or permission of the Director, and completion of Internship II or equivalent

EDU 480

Student Teaching in Elementary Education (10)

In Student Teaching, candidates seeking an Elementary Education K-8 endorsement co-teach with a cooperating teacher in a K-8 school placement for the required number of days to develop and demonstrate capacities to perform the full-time responsibilities of a teacher and to make a positive impact on student learning. During student teaching, candidates exhibit essential dispositions; demonstrate skill in planning, engagement, assessment, and reflection upon student learning; and collect evidence of performance that connects with standards and criteria for pre-service teachers. Through successful completion of student teaching, candidates demonstrate endorsement competencies required for residency teacher certification with an Elementary Education K-8 endorsement. Candidates seeking an approved second endorsement in this course must also demonstrate competencies of the second endorsement. Prerequisite: Pass state-required endorsement test(s)

Elementary Education and Early Childhood (180)

Take all Core and Internship/Student Teaching courses listed above, plus the following courses.

Elementary Education Core Requirements

EDE 307

Special Education and Special Programs (3)

This course provides general education teachers with the knowledge and skills to address the needs of students with disabilities in their classrooms. The course also surveys other special programs including ESL/bilingual, gifted education, and federal, state, and local compensatory programs and services. The course offers a holistic perspective of the range of human experience of special needs students, attitudes of individuals and society toward these individuals, and strategies for building a sense of classroom community to engage all students in meeting academic and interpersonal goals. In addition, this course provides opportunities for learning about collaborative models for involving families as well as other professionals in planning for students with special needs. Participants use role playing, observation, interviewing, and group investigations to learn about interventions and accommodations appropriate for K-8 students with special needs.

EDE 325

Sustainability and the Social Sciences (4)

This course focuses on a project-based approach to teaching the social sciences while establishing opportunities for direct classroom application and transformative student learning. Emphasis is placed on the integration of the social, ecological and economic dimensions of sustainability. Candidates learn to incorporate project-based pedagogy theory and practice and how best to implement them into classroom instruction.

EDE 370A

Content: Creative Arts Concepts (2)

This course focuses on the basic elements, principles, related concepts, and vocabulary of the creative arts. Emphasis is placed on developing the candidate's familiarity with a variety of art forms and how to integrate them into inter-disciplinary lesson plans and unit plans. Candidates will be able to effectively integrate the arts into planning academic curricula for K-8 classrooms.

EDE 403

Health and Fitness Methods (2)

This course provides an understanding of the potential empowering or limiting effects of health/fitness choices and habits on quality of life, health, and lifespan. Topics include exploration into health-related topics as well as candidate development of teaching skills necessary for effective health education and application of physical activities that promote fitness in the K-8 student learning environment.

Early Childhood K-3 Core Requirements

ECE 301

Foundations in Early Childhood Education (4)

This course provides an overview of early childhood education from historical and current perspectives. Emphasis is placed on events, philosophical theories, and people who influenced the development of early childhood programs. Students will reflect on issues and trends in early childhood education and use that information to determine the effectiveness of these contributions in recognized and accepted early childhood programs of today.

ECE 302

Cognitive Development and Brain Research (3)

This course explores the relationship between brain development and cognitive development. The course examines how cognitive neuroscience can inform the study of development and how a developmental approach can advance progress in cognitive neuroscience. The course covers topics ranging from the embryology of the brain to the development of memory, language, and locomotion. Students will be able to create appropriate curricula for children from birth through grade three in terms of understanding developmental phases and brain growth.

ECE 306

Family, Culture and Community Connections (3)

This course focuses on understanding the interrelationship of culture, home, language and beliefs. Emphasis is placed on examining the early learning environment including the social, emotional, cultural and intellectual variability of children from birth to age eight. Candidates reflect upon culturally and linguistically diverse differences of young children and design plans for communication and involvement of all families. Prerequisite: Per program plan, plan of study, or approval of program director.

ECE 308

Creativity, Play and Early Learning (3)

This course presents information on how to select and plan varied experiences in creative arts (dance, music, theater and visual art) for young learners. The course explores the use of creative art materials, activities, and environments through a variety of curriculum approaches. Candidates plan, imp

ECE 400

Pre-Primary and Primary Curriculum and Instruction (4)

This course focuses on foundational concepts, models and rationales for developing positive, content-rich learning opportunities for young children. Topics include developmentally appropriate, aligned, and intentionally designed curriculum, methods for teaching diverse learners, multiple forms of assessment, and the importance of family outreach, professional collaboration and reflection to enhance teaching. Students will be able to design, sequence, deliver, and evaluate integrated curriculum that facilitates the physical, cognitive, social, emotional, creative and ethical growth of all children ages birth to 8. Prerequisites: Admission to program or permission of the Director.

ECE 412

Developmentally Appropriate Practices for Infants and Toddlers (3)

Please check back soon for the full description.

Combined Requirements

EDE 433

Content: Mathematics I (4)

EDE 433 is the first of two courses that examine theoretical perspectives on mathematics education and methods of teaching and learning mathematics at the elementary and middle school levels. Candidates acquire and demonstrate practical experience in the understanding of the mathematics concepts and methods taught in grades K-8. In this course, candidates investigate various teaching strategies to motivate children, explore what it means to know and do mathematics, to solve problems, to use assessment to inform instruction, and to teach math equitably to all children.

EDE 439

Content: Mathematics II (4)

EDE 439 is the second of two math methods courses that examine theoretical perspectives on mathematics education and methods of teaching and learning mathematics at the elementary and middle school levels. Candidates acquire and demonstrate practical experience in the understanding of the mathematics concepts and methods taught in grades K-8. In this second course, candidates investigate various teaching strategies to motivate students, explore what it means to know and do mathematics, to solve problems, to use assessment to inform instruction, and to teach math equitably to all children.

EDU 308

American School Law and Issues in Special Populations (3)

This course examines public school law with an emphasis on the rights and responsibilities of students and teachers. Candidates analyze current issues and case studies specific to public education, special education and the education of recent immigrants for positive inclusion in a public school. Candidates learn professional boundaries, procedures, and resources to maintain a safe environment for teaching and learning.

EDU 313

Multicultural Education (2)

This course provides an introduction to the diversity of the American school population and the concepts, theories, and strategies that constitute multicultural education. Participants explore how children from diverse backgrounds construct knowledge within the contexts of their own socio-cultural backgrounds and how such diversity affects how the students are perceived in the classroom. Issues such as equity, race, ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, language, disability, and other special circumstances are explored. This course promotes the candidate’s sensitivity, acceptance, and ability to self-reflect in regards to issues related to diversity and inspires the candidate to do the same with his/her students.

EDU 320A

Content: Instructional Strategies P-12 (5)

This course examines the basic principles of quality instructional design and delivery. Topics include personalized learning as well as instructional strategies that promote learning experiences and enable both teacher and student to monitor learning progress. Candidates develop foundational understandings of how to prepare to teach a class when they have their own classrooms.

EDU 329

Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (4)

This course guides teacher certification candidates to demonstrate competency in inquiry-based approach to teaching STEM that emphasizes problem-solving and hands-on learning. Participants apply the cycle of inquiry to the essential components of science, technology, engineering and math: concepts, knowledge, understanding, skills, reasoning, product development and dispositions. The course provides opportunities for direct classroom application and transformative student learning.

EDU 383A

Content: Classroom Management (3)

This course is an introduction to theories and practice of classroom management. Emphasis is placed on candidate practice of skills and strategies necessary to establish and maintain classroom communities that will support student learning and human relationships.

EDU 404A

Content: Student Assessment and Evaluation (3)

This course is a required foundations course for all candidates in the Bachelor of Arts in Education Teacher Preparation Program. The course focuses on the usage of assessment in educational decision making as well as formative and summative classroom assessment and the necessary foundations, strategies, and understandings to assess and evaluation student learning and promote student self-assessment. Emphasis is placed on the skills necessary to make data-driven decisions and how these decisions impact instruction, curriculum, and services. Practical application of this knowledge will enable the candidate to use assessment in making placement and instructional decisions as well as assist students in the classroom in monitoring and assess their own learning. Prerequisite: Per program plan or plan of study

EDU 495

Positive Impact on Student Learning: Project (1)

As a requirement for completion of degree and certification requirements, in this course the candidate completes an impact on student learning project based on a unit of study developed and taught in conjunction with the Teacher Performance Assessment. Candidates participate in seminars, workshops and conferences designed to promote quality evidence and timely completion of the project. Each presentation is reviewed by faculty as evidence of the candidate's effectiveness in impacting student learning. Prerequisite: Pass state required endorsement test(s) and departmental approval.

ERL 436

Literacy Instruction and Assessment I (4)

This is the first of three courses in the literacy sequence for the undergraduate Teacher Certification Program. This course provides a foundation for literacy instruction. Topics include reading and writing instruction, response to literature, language acquisition, construction of meaning/comprehension, and strategies for English language learners. Candidates learn strategies for literacy instruction which can be used with all learners. Prerequisite: Per program plan, plan of study or approval of permission of program director

ERL 438

Literacy Instruction and Assessment II (4)

The second of three courses in the literacy sequence for the undergraduate Teacher Certification Program, this course examines a variety of assessment and instructional strategies. Topics include reading comprehension strategies, informational text, complex text, text density, writing and alignment with state standards. Upon completion of this course, candidates are able to effectively assess and teach literacy skills for K-8 students. Course Entry Requirement: Admission to BA in Education program. Course Entry Recommended: ERL 436.

ERL 440

Language Arts and Literacy Integration (4)

This is the last of three courses in the literacy sequence for the undergraduate evidence, evaluate interventions and become an effective researcher. Overall, the systematic collection of data is used to document positive impact on student learning. Note: Please see note on ERL 508.

ESP 423

Curriculum Modifications and Adaptation (2)

This course provides educators with the pedagogical foundations, strategies, and understanding to successfully modify and provide curriculum adaptations within the learning environment for the special needs of exceptional students. Course work and class activities includes topics on classroom arrangements, adaptive equipment, grouping, scheduling, homework materials selection, classroom management accommodations, effective delivery, and adaptation of subject content, as well as ways to foster student social competence and self-determination.

Internship and Student Teaching

EDU 337

Practicum (1)

This course covers effective integration, instructional strategies and assessments of the specific endorsement content area. This course provides the field experience required to meet state clinical requirements. Prerequisite: Pass state required endorsement test(s) and prior departmental approval.

EDU 349

September Experience (1)

In this September Experience, candidates complete the required number of days in a school classroom with guidance from a cooperating mentor teacher and field supervisor. Topics include essential dispositions and skills in planning for instruction, engaging students, and assessing learning. Completion of this introductory internship provides candidates the field-based perspectives and reflection skills needed to understand the tasks the teacher completes prior to students starting school and during the first weeks of the school year. Prerequisite: Preferred completion of the first two field internships unless approved by Director of Teacher Certification Programs.

EDU 350

Introduction to Field Experience (1)

This course focuses on acquainting students with the resources, documents and peer-interaction skills they will use throughout their educational program. Emphasis is placed on becoming familiar with available professional resources, essential professional dispositions and collaboration skills. Practical application of this knowledge will assist students in successfully accessing needed resources during their educational program and developing professional competency.

EDU 351

Internship I (1)

In this first field experience, candidates complete the required number of days in a school classroom with guidance of a cooperating teacher and field supervisor. Topics include essential dispositions and skills in planning for instruction, engaging students, and assessing learning. Completion of this introductory internship provides candidates field-based perspectives and reflection skills needed to improve performance in this and following field experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to the Bachelor of Arts in Education Program or permission of the Director

EDU 352

Internship II (1)

In this second developmental field experience, candidates complete the required number of days of internship in a school classroom with guidance of a cooperating teacher and a field supervisor. Topics include classroom duties; establishing a learning environment; working with individual students, small groups, and the whole-class; collaborative planning, instruction, and assessment; evidence of student learning; and developing collaboration and problem-solving skills. To build capacity regarding residency endorsement competencies, candidates plan and teach lessons or activities, journal reflectively about teaching and learning, pursue a professional development goal based in field performance, and reflect on practice. Prerequisite: Admission to the Bachelor of Arts in Education Program or permission of the Director, and completion of Internship I or equivalent

EDU 353

Internship III (1)

In this third developmental field experience, candidates complete the required number of days of internship in a school classroom with guidance of a cooperating teacher and a field supervisor. Related topics include establishing a learning environment; collaborative planning, instruction, and assessment; evidence of student learning; and developing collaboration and problem-solving skills. To build capacity regarding residency endorsement competencies, candidates plan and teach lessons or activities, journal reflectively about teaching and learning, pursue a professional development goal based in field performance, and reflect on practice. Prerequisite: Admission to the Bachelor of Arts in Education Program or permission of the Director, and completion of Internship II or equivalent

EDU 480

Student Teaching in Elementary Education (10)

In Student Teaching, candidates seeking an Elementary Education K-8 endorsement co-teach with a cooperating teacher in a K-8 school placement for the required number of days to develop and demonstrate capacities to perform the full-time responsibilities of a teacher and to make a positive impact on student learning. During student teaching, candidates exhibit essential dispositions; demonstrate skill in planning, engagement, assessment, and reflection upon student learning; and collect evidence of performance that connects with standards and criteria for pre-service teachers. Through successful completion of student teaching, candidates demonstrate endorsement competencies required for residency teacher certification with an Elementary Education K-8 endorsement. Candidates seeking an approved second endorsement in this course must also demonstrate competencies of the second endorsement. Prerequisite: Pass state-required endorsement test(s)

Elementary Education and Middle Level Math (184)

Elementary Education Core Requirements

EDE 307

Special Education and Special Programs (3)

This course provides general education teachers with the knowledge and skills to address the needs of students with disabilities in their classrooms. The course also surveys other special programs including ESL/bilingual, gifted education, and federal, state, and local compensatory programs and services. The course offers a holistic perspective of the range of human experience of special needs students, attitudes of individuals and society toward these individuals, and strategies for building a sense of classroom community to engage all students in meeting academic and interpersonal goals. In addition, this course provides opportunities for learning about collaborative models for involving families as well as other professionals in planning for students with special needs. Participants use role playing, observation, interviewing, and group investigations to learn about interventions and accommodations appropriate for K-8 students with special needs.

EDE 325

Sustainability and the Social Sciences (4)

This course focuses on a project-based approach to teaching the social sciences while establishing opportunities for direct classroom application and transformative student learning. Emphasis is placed on the integration of the social, ecological and economic dimensions of sustainability. Candidates learn to incorporate project-based pedagogy theory and practice and how best to implement them into classroom instruction.

EDE 370A

Content: Creative Arts Concepts (2)

This course focuses on the basic elements, principles, related concepts, and vocabulary of the creative arts. Emphasis is placed on developing the candidate's familiarity with a variety of art forms and how to integrate them into inter-disciplinary lesson plans and unit plans. Candidates will be able to effectively integrate the arts into planning academic curricula for K-8 classrooms.

EDE 403

Health and Fitness Methods (2)

This course provides an understanding of the potential empowering or limiting effects of health/fitness choices and habits on quality of life, health, and lifespan. Topics include exploration into health-related topics as well as candidate development of teaching skills necessary for effective health education and application of physical activities that promote fitness in the K-8 student learning environment.

Mathematics Core Requirements

EML 435

Mathematics: Number Sense and Theory (3)

Math endorsement candidates develop a conceptual understanding of and procedural facility with operations, number systems, ratios, and proportional relationships. Topics include the structure, properties, characteristics of and relationships between number systems including whole numbers, integers, rational, real, and complex numbers; operations of different number systems and their properties; representation, modeling, properties, and operations of vectors and matrices; the progression of learning that begins with the base-ten number system and operations thereof, builds into understanding of and operations with fractions and rational numbers, and extends to understandings of and operations with real numbers; ratios and proportional relationships, including additive and multiplicative perspectives; ratios, rates, and proportions; representation and analysis of proportional relationships using tables, graphs, equations, diagrams, concrete and mathematical models; and verbal description.

EML 445

Mathematics: Geometry and Measurement (3)

Math endorsement candidates develop conceptual understanding of geometric properties and relationships as they apply to congruence, similarity, geometric figures, and the Cartesian Coordinate System. Topics include modeling and solving real life and mathematical problems involving proof of theorems; congruence, similarity, and transformations; physical and technological constructions; lines, angle measure, area, surface area, and volume; classification, visualization, and description of two-dimensional figures and three-dimensional objects and the relationships among them; rigid motion; Pythagorean Theorem; angles, radii, arcs, chords, sectors of circles, and conic sections. Upon successful completion of this course, candidates have content knowledge to help K-12 students become college and career ready in geometry and measurement.

EML 481

Standards of Mathematics Practice (3)

Math endorsement students acquire functional understandings of the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics for content and pedagogy. Students focus on standards of mathematics practice, key shifts in mathematics, how students learn and do not learn math, collaborative teams, culturally responsive teaching, and Smarter Balance assessment. Students apply these learnings to specific math topics in the following content and pedagogy courses for the ultimate purpose of helping K-12 students become college and workplace ready in mathematics.

EML 482

Algebra and Functions (3)

Math endorsement candidates develop conceptual understanding of and procedural facility with algebra concepts emphasizing functions. Topics include operations, solution, and graphical representation of real life and mathematical problems using numerical and algebraic expressions, equations, and inequalities; proportional relationships, lines, and linear equations; functional notation and their models (linear, quadratic, simple rational, and exponential); algebraic expressions and functions (polynomials, rationals, roots); arithmetic properties and their proofs, equivalent forms; analysis and modeling of functions (linear, quadratic, exponential, trigonometric); and relationships between various representations of a function (graphs, tables, algebraic expressions, concrete models, contexts). Upon successful completion of this course, candidates have content knowledge to help K-12 students become college and career ready in algebra and functions.

EML 485

Mathematics: Probability and Statistics (3)

Math endorsements candidates develop conceptual understanding of an procedural facility with statistics and probability. Topics include summarizing, representing, and interpreting categorical and quantitative data; measures of central tendency, distributions, evaluation of random processes, populations and random sampling, randomization; single variable, multivariate, categorical, and continuous data; binomial probability distributions; the principles of probability; probability of compound events using technology to collect, represent, and analyze data; and using rules of probability to model, make predictions, evaluate decisions, and solve real world problems. Upon successful completion of this course, math endorsement candidates have content knowledge to help K-12 students become college and career ready in probability and statistics.

EML 490

Teaching Mathematics: Bringing It All Together (3)

Math endorsement candidates build skills in effective integration, instructional strategies, and assessments of mathematics in a secondary or middle school classroom. This course also provides candidates with a review of the content necessary to pass the WEST-E mathematics endorsement exam. Upon successful completion, candidates have improved skills needed to help make K-12 students college and career ready in mathematics.

Combined Requirements

EDE 433

Content: Mathematics I (4)

EDE 433 is the first of two courses that examine theoretical perspectives on mathematics education and methods of teaching and learning mathematics at the elementary and middle school levels. Candidates acquire and demonstrate practical experience in the understanding of the mathematics concepts and methods taught in grades K-8. In this course, candidates investigate various teaching strategies to motivate children, explore what it means to know and do mathematics, to solve problems, to use assessment to inform instruction, and to teach math equitably to all children.

EDE 439

Content: Mathematics II (4)

EDE 439 is the second of two math methods courses that examine theoretical perspectives on mathematics education and methods of teaching and learning mathematics at the elementary and middle school levels. Candidates acquire and demonstrate practical experience in the understanding of the mathematics concepts and methods taught in grades K-8. In this second course, candidates investigate various teaching strategies to motivate students, explore what it means to know and do mathematics, to solve problems, to use assessment to inform instruction, and to teach math equitably to all children.

EDU 308

American School Law and Issues in Special Populations (3)

This course examines public school law with an emphasis on the rights and responsibilities of students and teachers. Candidates analyze current issues and case studies specific to public education, special education and the education of recent immigrants for positive inclusion in a public school. Candidates learn professional boundaries, procedures, and resources to maintain a safe environment for teaching and learning.

EDU 313

Multicultural Education (2)

This course provides an introduction to the diversity of the American school population and the concepts, theories, and strategies that constitute multicultural education. Participants explore how children from diverse backgrounds construct knowledge within the contexts of their own socio-cultural backgrounds and how such diversity affects how the students are perceived in the classroom. Issues such as equity, race, ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, language, disability, and other special circumstances are explored. This course promotes the candidate’s sensitivity, acceptance, and ability to self-reflect in regards to issues related to diversity and inspires the candidate to do the same with his/her students.

EDU 320A

Content: Instructional Strategies P-12 (5)

This course examines the basic principles of quality instructional design and delivery. Topics include personalized learning as well as instructional strategies that promote learning experiences and enable both teacher and student to monitor learning progress. Candidates develop foundational understandings of how to prepare to teach a class when they have their own classrooms.

EDU 329

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (4)

This course guides teacher certification candidates to demonstrate competency in inquiry-based approach to teaching STEM that emphasizes problem-solving and hands-on learning. Participants apply the cycle of inquiry to the essential components of science, technology, engineering and math: concepts, knowledge, understanding, skills, reasoning, product development and dispositions. The course provides opportunities for direct classroom application and transformative student learning.

EDU 383A

Content: Classroom Management (3)

This course is an introduction to theories and practice of classroom management. Emphasis is placed on candidate practice of skills and strategies necessary to establish and maintain classroom communities that will support student learning and human relationships.

EDU 404A

Content: Student Assessment and Evaluation (3)

This course is a required foundations course for all candidates in the Bachelor of Arts in Education Teacher Preparation Program. The course focuses on the usage of assessment in educational decision making as well as formative and summative classroom assessment and the necessary foundations, strategies, and understandings to assess and evaluation student learning and promote student self-assessment. Emphasis is placed on the skills necessary to make data-driven decisions and how these decisions impact instruction, curriculum, and services. Practical application of this knowledge will enable the candidate to use assessment in making placement and instructional decisions as well as assist students in the classroom in monitoring and assess their own learning. Prerequisite: Per program plan or plan of study

EDU 495

Positive Impact on Student Learning: Project (1)

As a requirement for completion of degree and certification requirements, in this course the candidate completes an impact on student learning project based on a unit of study developed and taught in conjunction with the Teacher Performance Assessment. Candidates participate in seminars, workshops and conferences designed to promote quality evidence and timely completion of the project. Each presentation is reviewed by faculty as evidence of the candidate's effectiveness in impacting student learning. Prerequisite: Pass state required endorsement test(s) and departmental approval.

ERL 436

Literacy Instruction and Assessment I (4)

This is the first of three courses in the literacy sequence for the undergraduate Teacher Certification Program. This course provides a foundation for literacy instruction. Topics include reading and writing instruction, response to literature, language acquisition, construction of meaning/comprehension, and strategies for English language learners. Candidates learn strategies for literacy instruction which can be used with all learners. Prerequisite: Per program plan, plan of study or approval of permission of program director

ERL 438

Literacy Instruction and Assessment II (4)

The second of three courses in the literacy sequence for the undergraduate Teacher Certification Program, this course examines a variety of assessment and instructional strategies. Topics include reading comprehension strategies, informational text, complex text, text density, writing and alignment with state standards. Upon completion of this course, candidates are able to effectively assess and teach literacy skills for K-8 students. Course Entry Requirement: Admission to BA in Education program. Course Entry Recommended: ERL 436.

ERL 440

Language Arts and Literacy Integration (4)

This is the last of three courses in the literacy sequence for the undergraduate evidence, evaluate interventions and become an effective researcher. Overall, the systematic collection of data is used to document positive impact on student learning. Note: Please see note on ERL 508.

ESP 423

Curriculum Modifications and Adaptation (2)

This course provides educators with the pedagogical foundations, strategies, and understanding to successfully modify and provide curriculum adaptations within the learning environment for the special needs of exceptional students. Course work and class activities includes topics on classroom arrangements, adaptive equipment, grouping, scheduling, homework materials selection, classroom management accommodations, effective delivery, and adaptation of subject content, as well as ways to foster student social competence and self-determination.

Internship and Student Teaching

EDU 349

September Experience (1)

In this September Experience, candidates complete the required number of days in a school classroom with guidance from a cooperating mentor teacher and field supervisor. Topics include essential dispositions and skills in planning for instruction, engaging students, and assessing learning. Completion of this introductory internship provides candidates the field-based perspectives and reflection skills needed to understand the tasks the teacher completes prior to students starting school and during the first weeks of the school year. Prerequisite: Preferred completion of the first two field internships unless approved by Director of Teacher Certification Programs.

EDU 350

Introduction to Field Experience (1)

This course focuses on acquainting students with the resources, documents and peer-interaction skills they will use throughout their educational program. Emphasis is placed on becoming familiar with available professional resources, essential professional dispositions and collaboration skills. Practical application of this knowledge will assist students in successfully accessing needed resources during their educational program and developing professional competency.

EDU 351

Internship I (1)

In this first field experience, candidates complete the required number of days in a school classroom with guidance of a cooperating teacher and field supervisor. Topics include essential dispositions and skills in planning for instruction, engaging students, and assessing learning. Completion of this introductory internship provides candidates field-based perspectives and reflection skills needed to improve performance in this and following field experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to the Bachelor of Arts in Education Program or permission of the Director

EDU 352

Internship II (1)

In this second developmental field experience, candidates complete the required number of days of internship in a school classroom with guidance of a cooperating teacher and a field supervisor. Topics include classroom duties; establishing a learning environment; working with individual students, small groups, and the whole-class; collaborative planning, instruction, and assessment; evidence of student learning; and developing collaboration and problem-solving skills. To build capacity regarding residency endorsement competencies, candidates plan and teach lessons or activities, journal reflectively about teaching and learning, pursue a professional development goal based in field performance, and reflect on practice. Prerequisite: Admission to the Bachelor of Arts in Education Program or permission of the Director, and completion of Internship I or equivalent

EDU 353

Internship III (1)

In this third developmental field experience, candidates complete the required number of days of internship in a school classroom with guidance of a cooperating teacher and a field supervisor. Related topics include establishing a learning environment; collaborative planning, instruction, and assessment; evidence of student learning; and developing collaboration and problem-solving skills. To build capacity regarding residency endorsement competencies, candidates plan and teach lessons or activities, journal reflectively about teaching and learning, pursue a professional development goal based in field performance, and reflect on practice. Prerequisite: Admission to the Bachelor of Arts in Education Program or permission of the Director, and completion of Internship II or equivalent.

EDU 480

Student Teaching in Elementary Education (10)

In Student Teaching, candidates seeking an Elementary Education K-8 endorsement co-teach with a cooperating teacher in a K-8 school placement for the required number of days to develop and demonstrate capacities to perform the full-time responsibilities of a teacher and to make a positive impact on student learning. During student teaching, candidates exhibit essential dispositions; demonstrate skill in planning, engagement, assessment, and reflection upon student learning; and collect evidence of performance that connects with standards and criteria for pre-service teachers. Through successful completion of student teaching, candidates demonstrate endorsement competencies required for residency teacher certification with an Elementary Education K-8 endorsement. Candidates seeking an approved second endorsement in this course must also demonstrate competencies of the second endorsement. Prerequisite: Pass state-required endorsement test(s)

EDU 493

Student Teaching (7)

In Student Teaching, candidates seeking an endorsement co-teach with a cooperating teacher in a school placement for a minimum of 60 days to develop and demonstrate capacities to perform the full-time responsibilities of a teacher and to make a positive impact on student learning. During student teaching, candidates exhibit essential dispositions; demonstrate skill in planning, engagement, assessment and reflection upon student learning; and collect evidence of performance that connects with standards and criteria for pre-service teachers. Through successful completion of student teaching, candidates demonstrate endorsement competencies required for residency teacher certification. Course Entry Requirements: 1) Pass the WEST-E(s) for the endorsement(s) sought and relevant to the placement; 2) Pass all course requirements with 2.0 or higher grade; 3) Pass internships leading to student teaching; 4) Achieve a 2.5 or higher cumulative GPA; 5) Accept school assignment as arranged by Placement Coordinator.

Elementary Education and Special Education (184)

Elementary Education Core Requirements

EDE 307

Special Education and Special Programs (3)

This course provides general education teachers with the knowledge and skills to address the needs of students with disabilities in their classrooms. The course also surveys other special programs including ESL/Bilingual, gifted education, and federal, state, and local compensatory programs and services. The course offers a holistic perspective of the range of human experience of special needs students, attitudes of individuals and society toward these individuals, and strategies for building a sense of classroom community to engage all students in meeting academic and interpersonal goals. In addition, this course provides opportunities for learning about collaborative models for involving families as well as other professionals in planning for students with special needs. Participants use role playing, observation, interviewing, and group investigations to learn about interventions and accommodations appropriate for K-8 students with special needs.

EDE 325

Sustainability and the Social Sciences (4)

This course focuses on a project-based approach to teaching the Social sciences while establishing opportunities for direct classroom application and transformative student learning. Emphasis is placed on the integration of the social, ecological and economic dimensions of sustainability. Candidates learn to incorporate project-based pedagogy theory and practice and how best to implement them into classroom instruction.

EDE 370A

Content: Creative Arts Concepts (2)

This course focuses on the basic elements, principles, related concepts, and vocabulary of the creative arts. Emphasis is placed on developing the candidate's familiarity with a variety of art forms and how to integrate them into inter-disciplinary lesson plans and unit plans. Candidates will be able to effectively integrate the arts into planning academic curricula for K-8 classrooms.

EDE 403

Health and Fitness Methods (2)

This course provides an understanding of the potential empowering or limiting effects of health/fitness choices and habits on quality of life, health and lifespan. Topics include exploration into health-related topics as well as candidate development of teaching skills necessary for effective health education and application of physical activities that promote fitness in the K-8 student learning environment.

Special Education Core Requirements

ESP 370A

Content: Exceptionality in Special Education (4)

The purpose of this course is to inform candidates on both inclusion and specialist paradigms in special education, including definitions of disabilities and program delivery. This course emphasizes identification, specific needs of students, service delivery, and legal issues. Practical application of these principles will form the foundation for future special education courses. Prerequisite: Per program plan, plan of study, or approval of program director.

ESP 373

Special Education: Low-Incidence Students (3)

This course is a study of students identified with low-incidence disabilities such as: Developmentally Delayed, Autism Spectrum, Moderate/Severe Mental Retardation, Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), Orthopedically Impaired, Deaf/Hard of Hearing and Visually Impaired. Components of the course include definitions, family involvement, assessments, instructional methods, procedural, and landmark legal issues in Special Education. Candidates provide appropriate program accommodations for students identified with a low-incidence disability. Prerequisites: Admittance to the Bachelor of Arts in Education program or prior approval of the Program Director or Senior Faculty is required before students begin this course.

ESP 376

Autism (3)

The purpose of this course is to provide the candidate opportunities to delineate and define autism spectrum disorders (differences and similarities). The course emphasizes knowledge of autism spectrum disorders with regard to severity and intensity and other characteristics unique to each disorder. Candidates apply information learned in this course to meet the educational aspects of students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Prerequisites: Admittance to the Bachelor of Arts in Education program or prior approval of the Program Director or Senior Faculty is required before students begin this course.

ESP 405

Behavior Analysis and Management (3)

The purpose of this course is to provide candidates opportunities to explore models for analyzing and managing student behavior. The course emphasizes basic types of student behavior, motivation, prevention strategies, intervention strategies and behavior change plans. Practical application of these principles will be demonstrated through the completion of data collection samples, a functional behavioral assessment, positive behavior support plan, and emergency response protocols for use of restraint and/or isolation interventions. Prerequisite: Admittance to BAEd or endorsement-only program or prior departmental approval.

ESP 408

Student Assessment and Evaluation (3)

This course focuses on the necessary foundations, strategies and understanding to successfully perform assessments and evaluations in the classroom for placement and implementation of programs for students receiving special education services. Emphasis is placed on the selection of appropriate assessment and evaluation tools, timelines and the interrelationship between assessment components. Candidates demonstrate selection of appropriate assessment tool and accurately interpret data used in the assessment process for qualification and implementation of individual programs for students receiving special education services.

ESP 409A

Content: Fundamentals of the IEP Process (3)

The purpose of this course is to provide candidates with the compliance elements necessary for writing and implementing a quality Individualized Educational Plan (IEP). This course emphasizes State and Federal mandates, procedural safeguards, IEP content requirements, and parent participation. Upon successful completion of this course, candidates will be able to write an appropriate IEP that meets the needs of students identified with (a) special education need(s).

Combined Core Requirements

EDE 433

Content: Mathematics I (4)

EDE 433 is the first of two courses that examine theoretical perspectives on mathematics education and methods of teaching and learning mathematics at the elementary and middle school levels. Candidates acquire and demonstrate practical experience in the understanding of the mathematics concepts and methods taught in grades K-8. In this course, candidates investigate various teaching strategies to motivate children, explore what it means to know and do mathematics, to solve problems, to use assessment to inform instruction, and to teach math equitably to all children.

EDE 439

Content: Mathematics II (4)

EDE 439 is the second of two math methods courses that examine theoretical perspectives on mathematics education and methods of teaching and learning mathematics at the elementary and middle school levels. Candidates acquire and demonstrate practical experience in the understanding of the mathematics concepts and methods taught in grades K-8. In this second course, candidates investigate various teaching strategies to motivate students, explore what it means to know and do mathematics, to solve problems, to use assessment to inform instruction, and to teach math equitably to all children.

EDU 308

American School Law and Issues in Special Populations (3)

This course examines public school law with an emphasis on the rights and responsibilities of students and teachers. Candidates analyze current issues and case studies specific to public education, special education and the education of recent immigrants for positive inclusion in a public school. Candidates learn professional boundaries, procedures, and resources to maintain a safe environment for teaching and learning.

EDU 313

Multicultural Education (2)

This course provides an introduction to the diversity of the American school population and the concepts, theories, and strategies that constitute multicultural education. Participants explore how children from diverse backgrounds construct knowledge within the contexts of their own socio-cultural backgrounds and how such diversity affects how the students are perceived in the classroom. Issues such as equity, race, ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, language, disability, and other special circumstances are explored. This course promotes the candidate’s sensitivity, acceptance, and ability to self-reflect in regards to issues related to diversity and inspires the candidate to do the same with his/her students.

EDU 320A

Content: Instructional Strategies P-12 (5)

This course examines the basic principles of quality instructional design and delivery. Topics include personalized learning as well as instructional strategies that promote learning experiences and enable both teacher and student to monitor learning progress. Candidates develop foundational understandings of how to prepare to teach a class when they have their own classrooms.

EDU 329

Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (4)

This course guides teacher certification candidates to demonstrate competency in inquiry-based approach to teaching STEM that emphasizes problem-solving and hands-on learning. Participants apply the cycle of inquiry to the essential components of science, technology, engineering and math: concepts, knowledge, understanding, skills, reasoning, product development and dispositions. The course provides opportunities for direct classroom application and transformative student learning.

EDU 383A

Content: Classroom Management (3)

This course is an introduction to theories and practice of classroom management. Emphasis is placed on candidate practice of skills and strategies necessary to establish and maintain classroom communities that will support student learning and human relationships.

EDU 404A

Content: Student Assessment and Evaluation (3)

This course is a required foundations course for all candidates in the Bachelor of Arts in Education Teacher Preparation Program. The course focuses on the usage of assessment in educational decision making as well as formative and summative classroom assessment and the necessary foundations, strategies, and understandings to assess and evaluation student learning and promote student self-assessment. Emphasis is placed on the skills necessary to make data-driven decisions and how these decisions impact instruction, curriculum, and services. Practical application of this knowledge will enable the candidate to use assessment in making placement and instructional decisions as well as assist students in the classroom in monitoring and assess their own learning. Prerequisite: Per program plan or plan of study

EDU 495

Positive Impact on Student Learning: Project (1)

As a requirement for completion of degree and certification requirements, in this course the candidate completes an impact on student learning project based on a unit of study developed and taught in conjunction with the Teacher Performance Assessment. Candidates participate in seminars, workshops and conferences designed to promote quality evidence and timely completion of the project. Each presentation is reviewed by faculty as evidence of the candidate's effectiveness in impacting student learning. Prerequisite: Pass state required endorsement test(s) and departmental approval.

ERL 436

Literacy Instruction and Assessment I (4)

This is the first of three courses in the literacy sequence for the undergraduate Teacher Certification Program. This course provides a foundation for literacy instruction. Topics include reading and writing instruction, response to literature, language acquisition, construction of meaning/comprehension, and strategies for English language learners. Candidates learn strategies for literacy instruction which can be used with all learners. Prerequisite: Per program plan, plan of study or approval of permission of program director

ERL 438

Literacy Instruction and Assessment II (4)

The second of three courses in the literacy sequence for the undergraduate Teacher Certification Program, this course examines a variety of assessment and instructional strategies. Topics include reading comprehension strategies, informational text, complex text, text density, writing and alignment with state standards. Upon completion of this course, candidates are able to effectively assess and teach literacy skills for K-8 students. Course Entry Requirement: Admission to BA in Education program. Course Entry Recommended: ERL 436.

ERL 440

Language Arts and Literacy Integration (4)

This is the last of three courses in the literacy sequence for the undergraduate evidence, evaluate interventions and become an effective researcher. Overall, the systematic collection of data is used to document positive impact on student learning. Note: Please see note on ERL 508.

ESP 423

Curriculum Modifications and Adaptation (2)

This course provides educators with the pedagogical foundations, strategies, and understanding to successfully modify and provide curriculum adaptations within the learning environment for the special needs of exceptional students. Course work and class activities includes topics on classroom arrangements, adaptive equipment, grouping, scheduling, homework materials selection, classroom management accommodations, effective delivery, and adaptation of subject content, as well as ways to foster student social competence and self-determination.

Internship and Student Teaching

EDU 349

September Experience (1)

In this September Experience, candidates complete the required number of days in a school classroom with guidance from a cooperating mentor teacher and field supervisor. Topics include essential dispositions and skills in planning for instruction, engaging students, and assessing learning. Completion of this introductory internship provides candidates the field-based perspectives and reflection skills needed to understand the tasks the teacher completes prior to students starting school and during the first weeks of the school year. Prerequisite: Preferred completion of the first two field internships unless approved by Director of Teacher Certification Programs.

EDU 350

Introduction to Field Experience (1)

This course focuses on acquainting students with the resources, documents and peer-interaction skills they will use throughout their educational program. Emphasis is placed on becoming familiar with available professional resources, essential professional dispositions and collaboration skills. Practical application of this knowledge will assist students in successfully accessing needed resources during their educational program and developing professional competency.

EDU 351

Internship I (1)

In this first field experience, candidates complete the required number of days in a school classroom with guidance of a cooperating teacher and field supervisor. Topics include essential dispositions and skills in planning for instruction, engaging students, and assessing learning. Completion of this introductory internship provides candidates field-based perspectives and reflection skills needed to improve performance in this and following field experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to the Bachelor of Arts in Education Program or permission of the Director

EDU 352

Internship II (1)

In this second developmental field experience, candidates complete the required number of days of internship in a school classroom with guidance of a cooperating teacher and a field supervisor. Topics include classroom duties; establishing a learning environment; working with individual students, small groups, and the whole-class; collaborative planning, instruction, and assessment; evidence of student learning; and developing collaboration and problem-solving skills. To build capacity regarding residency endorsement competencies, candidates plan and teach lessons or activities, journal reflectively about teaching and learning, pursue a professional development goal based in field performance, and reflect on practice. Prerequisite: Admission to the Bachelor of Arts in Education Program or permission of the Director, and completion of Internship I or equivalent

EDU 353

Internship III (1)

In this third developmental field experience, candidates complete the required number of days of internship in a school classroom with guidance of a cooperating teacher and a field supervisor. Related topics include establishing a learning environment; collaborative planning, instruction, and assessment; evidence of student learning; and developing collaboration and problem-solving skills. To build capacity regarding residency endorsement competencies, candidates plan and teach lessons or activities, journal reflectively about teaching and learning, pursue a professional development goal based in field performance, and reflect on practice. Prerequisite: Admission to the Bachelor of Arts in Education Program or permission of the Director, and completion of Internship II or equivalent

EDU 480

Student Teaching in Elementary Education (10)

In Student Teaching, candidates seeking an Elementary Education K-8 endorsement co-teach with a cooperating teacher in a K-8 school placement for the required number of days to develop and demonstrate capacities to perform the full-time responsibilities of a teacher and to make a positive impact on student learning. During student teaching, candidates exhibit essential dispositions; demonstrate skill in planning, engagement, assessment, and reflection upon student learning; and collect evidence of performance that connects with standards and criteria for pre-service teachers. Through successful completion of student teaching, candidates demonstrate endorsement competencies required for residency teacher certification with an Elementary Education K-8 endorsement. Candidates seeking an approved second endorsement in this course must also demonstrate competencies of the second endorsement. Prerequisite: Pass state-required endorsement test(s)

ESP 465

Transitions, Teaming and Collaboration (1)

The purpose of this course is for the teacher candidate to understand the collaborative relationships with other educators in the educational setting, inclusion of family members as part of the team, and working with schools/agencies for successful transitions. Topics include techniques to supervise paraprofessionals, transitions, meeting diversity and multicultural needs. Candidates will be able to facilitate meetings involving all appropriate participants and develop successful transition plans. Prerequisites: Entry to Special Education teacher endorsement program.

ESP 485

Student Teaching in Special Education (9)

In Student Teaching, candidates seeking an Special Education P-12 endorsement co-teach with a cooperating teacher in a school special education placement for the required number of days to develop and demonstrate capacities to perform the full-time responsibilities of a teacher and to make a positive impact on student learning. During student teaching, candidates exhibit essential dispositions; demonstrate skill in planning, engagement, assessment, and reflection upon student learning; and collect evidence of performance that connects with standards and criteria for pre-service teachers. Through successful completion of student teaching, candidates demonstrate endorsement competencies required for residency teacher certification with a Special Education P-12 endorsement. Candidates seeking an approved second endorsement in this course must also demonstrate competencies of the second endorsement. Prerequisite: Pass the state required test for SPED endorsement and approval of program director

Elementary Education and ELL (180)

Elementary Education Core Requirements

EDE 307

Special Education and Special Programs (3)

This course provides general education teachers with the knowledge and skills to address the needs of students with disabilities in their classrooms. The course also surveys other special programs including ESL/bilingual, gifted education, and federal, state, and local compensatory programs and services. The course offers a holistic perspective of the range of human experience of special needs students, attitudes of individuals and society toward these individuals, and strategies for building a sense of classroom community to engage all students in meeting academic and interpersonal goals. In addition, this course provides opportunities for learning about collaborative models for involving families as well as other professionals in planning for students with special needs. Participants use role playing, observation, interviewing, and group investigations to learn about interventions and accommodations appropriate for K-8 students with special needs.

EDE 325

Sustainability and the Social sciences (4)

This course focuses on a project-based approach to teaching the social sciences while establishing opportunities for direct classroom application and transformative student learning. Emphasis is placed on the integration of the social, ecological and economic dimensions of sustainability. Candidates learn to incorporate project-based pedagogy theory and practice and how best to implement them into classroom instruction.

EDE 370A

Content: Creative Arts Concepts (2)

This course focuses on the basic elements, principles, related concepts, and vocabulary of the creative arts. Emphasis is placed on developing the candidate's familiarity with a variety of art forms and how to integrate them into inter-disciplinary lesson plans and unit plans. Candidates will be able to effectively integrate the arts into planning academic curricula for K-8 classrooms.

EDE 403

Health and Fitness Methods (2)

This course provides an understanding of the potential empowering or limiting effects of health/fitness choices and habits on quality of life, health, and lifespan. Topics include exploration into health-related topics as well as candidate development of teaching skills necessary for effective health education and application of physical activities that promote fitness in the K-8 student learning environment.

English Language Learners Core Requirements

ESL 415

Methodology: Reading (4)

This course examines literacy instructional strategies for English language learners. Topics include reading assessment, vocabulary, and comprehension. Upon completion of this course, candidates have the skills to design and modify reading instruction for P-12 ELL students. Prerequisite: Per program plan, plan of study, or approval of program director.

ESL 421

Linguistics and Language Acquisition (5)

This course is an introduction to the principles and uses of linguistics as they pertain to the teaching of English Language Learners (ELL) and the process of second language acquisition. Candidates investigate theories of language learning, evaluate language acquisition theories, and review the major factors that affect second language learning. Candidates examine ELL teaching methods and create their own theories about language learning and teaching. The focus is the nature of human language, grammatical aspects of language, psychology of language, and language in society. Candidates examine the theoretical principles, analyze their applicability, and determine how to use them effectively when teaching ELL classes.

ESL 431

History of Bi-Lingual Education and Advocacy (3)

This course is an introduction to the history of bilingual education, relevant federal education legislation, and court cases which are related to the teaching of English to students whose first language is not English. Legal cases relevant to advocacy for English Language Learners (ELL) and their families are examined. Prerequisite: Per program plan, plan of study, or approval of program director.

ESL 434

Learning Strategies and Assessment (5)

Through this course, students will consider the cross-cultural factors that influence second language learners and investigate what instructional practices and materials are best suited for specific situations. They will also examine topics such as cooperative learning, cross-cultural testing, peer teaching, and methods for integrating content and language. Prerequisite: Per program plan, plan of study, or approval of program director.

Combined Requirements

ECE 302

Cognitive Development and Brain Research (3)

This course explores the relationship between brain development and cognitive development. The course examines how cognitive neuroscience can inform the study of development and how a developmental approach can advance progress in cognitive neuroscience. The course covers topics ranging from the embryology of the brain to the development of memory, language, and locomotion. Students will be able to create appropriate curricula for children from birth through grade three in terms of understanding developmental phases and brain growth.

EDE 433

Content: Mathematics I (4)

EDE 433 is the first of two courses that examine theoretical perspectives on mathematics education and methods of teaching and learning mathematics at the elementary and middle school levels. Candidates acquire and demonstrate practical experience in the understanding of the mathematics concepts and methods taught in grades K-8. In this course, candidates investigate various teaching strategies to motivate children, explore what it means to know and do mathematics, to solve problems, to use assessment to inform instruction, and to teach math equitably to all children.

EDE 439

Content: Mathematics II (4)

EDE 439 is the second of two math methods courses that examine theoretical perspectives on mathematics education and methods of teaching and learning mathematics at the elementary and middle school levels. Candidates acquire and demonstrate practical experience in the understanding of the mathematics concepts and methods taught in grades K-8. In this second course, candidates investigate various teaching strategies to motivate students, explore what it means to know and do mathematics, to solve problems, to use assessment to inform instruction, and to teach math equitably to all children.

EDU 308

American School Law and Issues in Special Populations (3)

This course examines public school law with an emphasis on the rights and responsibilities of students and teachers. Candidates analyze current issues and case studies specific to public education, special education and the education of recent immigrants for positive inclusion in a public school. Candidates learn professional boundaries, procedures, and resources to maintain a safe environment for teaching and learning.

EDU 313

Multicultural Education (2)

This course provides an introduction to the diversity of the American school population and the concepts, theories, and strategies that constitute multicultural education. Participants explore how children from diverse backgrounds construct knowledge within the contexts of their own socio-cultural backgrounds and how such diversity affects how the students are perceived in the classroom. Issues such as equity, race, ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, language, disability, and other special circumstances are explored. This course promotes the candidate’s sensitivity, acceptance, and ability to self-reflect in regards to issues related to diversity and inspires the candidate to do the same with his/her students.

EDU 320A

Content: Instructional Strategies P-12 (5)

This course examines the basic principles of quality instructional design and delivery. Topics include personalized learning as well as instructional strategies that promote learning experiences and enable both teacher and student to monitor learning progress. Candidates develop foundational understandings of how to prepare to teach a class when they have their own classrooms.

EDU 329

Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (4)

This course guides teacher certification candidates to demonstrate competency in inquiry-based approach to teaching STEM that emphasizes problem-solving and hands-on learning. Participants apply the cycle of inquiry to the essential components of science, technology, engineering and math: concepts, knowledge, understanding, skills, reasoning, product development and dispositions. The course provides opportunities for direct classroom application and transformative student learning.

EDU 383A

Content: Classroom Management (3)

This course is an introduction to theories and practice of classroom management. Emphasis is placed on candidate practice of skills and strategies necessary to establish and maintain classroom communities that will support student learning and human relationships.

EDU 404A

Content: Student Assessment and Evaluation (3)

This course is a required foundations course for all candidates in the Bachelor of Arts in Education Teacher Preparation Program. The course focuses on the usage of assessment in educational decision making as well as formative and summative classroom assessment and the necessary foundations, strategies, and understandings to assess and evaluation student learning and promote student self-assessment. Emphasis is placed on the skills necessary to make data-driven decisions and how these decisions impact instruction, curriculum, and services. Practical application of this knowledge will enable the candidate to use assessment in making placement and instructional decisions as well as assist students in the classroom in monitoring and assess their own learning. Prerequisite: Per program plan or plan of study

EDU 495

Positive Impact on Student Learning: Project (1)

As a requirement for completion of degree and certification requirements, in this course the candidate completes an impact on student learning project based on a unit of study developed and taught in conjunction with the Teacher Performance Assessment. Candidates participate in seminars, workshops and conferences designed to promote quality evidence and timely completion of the project. Each presentation is reviewed by faculty as evidence of the candidate's effectiveness in impacting student learning. Prerequisite: Pass state required endorsement test(s) and departmental approval.

ERL 436

Literacy Instruction and Assessment I (4)

This is the first of three courses in the literacy sequence for the undergraduate Teacher Certification Program. This course provides a foundation for literacy instruction. Topics include reading and writing instruction, response to literature, language acquisition, construction of meaning/comprehension, and strategies for English language learners. Candidates learn strategies for literacy instruction which can be used with all learners. Prerequisite: Per program plan, plan of study or approval of permission of program director

ERL 438

Literacy Instruction and Assessment II (4)

The second of three courses in the literacy sequence for the undergraduate Teacher Certification Program, this course examines a variety of assessment and instructional strategies. Topics include reading comprehension strategies, informational text, complex text, text density, writing and alignment with state standards. Upon completion of this course, candidates are able to effectively assess and teach literacy skills for K-8 students. Course Entry Requirement: Admission to BA in Education program. Course Entry Recommended: ERL 436.

ERL 440

Language Arts and Literacy Integration (4)

This is the last of three courses in the literacy sequence for the undergraduate evidence, evaluate interventions and become an effective researcher. Overall, the systematic collection of data is used to document positive impact on student learning. Note: Please see note on ERL 508.

ESP 423

Curriculum Modifications and Adaptation (2)

This course provides educators with the pedagogical foundations, strategies, and understanding to successfully modify and provide curriculum adaptations within the learning environment for the special needs of exceptional students. Course work and class activities includes topics on classroom arrangements, adaptive equipment, grouping, scheduling, homework materials selection, classroom management accommodations, effective delivery, and adaptation of subject content, as well as ways to foster student social competence and self-determination.

Internship and Student Teaching

EDU 337

Practicum (1)

This course covers effective integration, instructional strategies and assessments of the specific endorsement content area. This course provides the field experience required to meet state clinical requirements. Prerequisite: Pass state required endorsement test(s) and prior departmental approval.

EDU 349

September Experience (1)

In this September Experience, candidates complete the required number of days in a school classroom with guidance from a cooperating mentor teacher and field supervisor. Topics include essential dispositions and skills in planning for instruction, engaging students, and assessing learning. Completion of this introductory internship provides candidates the field-based perspectives and reflection skills needed to understand the tasks the teacher completes prior to students starting school and during the first weeks of the school year. Prerequisite: Preferred completion of the first two field internships unless approved by Director of Teacher Certification Programs.

EDU 350

Introduction to Field Experience (1)

This course focuses on acquainting students with the resources, documents and peer-interaction skills they will use throughout their educational program. Emphasis is placed on becoming familiar with available professional resources, essential professional dispositions and collaboration skills. Practical application of this knowledge will assist students in successfully accessing needed resources during their educational program and developing professional competency.

EDU 351

Internship I (1)

In this first field experience, candidates complete the required number of days in a school classroom with guidance of a cooperating teacher and field supervisor. Topics include essential dispositions and skills in planning for instruction, engaging students, and assessing learning. Completion of this introductory internship provides candidates field-based perspectives and reflection skills needed to improve performance in this and following field experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to the Bachelor of Arts in Education Program or permission of the Director

EDU 352

Internship II (1)

In this second developmental field experience, candidates complete the required number of days of internship in a school classroom with guidance of a cooperating teacher and a field supervisor. Topics include classroom duties; establishing a learning environment; working with individual students, small groups, and the whole-class; collaborative planning, instruction, and assessment; evidence of student learning; and developing collaboration and problem-solving skills. To build capacity regarding residency endorsement competencies, candidates plan and teach lessons or activities, journal reflectively about teaching and learning, pursue a professional development goal based in field performance, and reflect on practice. Prerequisite: Admission to the Bachelor of Arts in Education Program or permission of the Director, and completion of Internship I or equivalent

EDU 353

Internship III (1)

In this third developmental field experience, candidates complete the required number of days of internship in a school classroom with guidance of a cooperating teacher and a field supervisor. Related topics include establishing a learning environment; collaborative planning, instruction, and assessment; evidence of student learning; and developing collaboration and problem-solving skills. To build capacity regarding residency endorsement competencies, candidates plan and teach lessons or activities, journal reflectively about teaching and learning, pursue a professional development goal based in field performance, and reflect on practice. Prerequisite: Admission to the Bachelor of Arts in Education Program or permission of the Director, and completion of Internship II or equivalent

EDU 480

Student Teaching in Elementary Education (10)

In Student Teaching, candidates seeking an Elementary Education K-8 endorsement co-teach with a cooperating teacher in a K-8 school placement for the required number of days to develop and demonstrate capacities to perform the full-time responsibilities of a teacher and to make a positive impact on student learning. During student teaching, candidates exhibit essential dispositions; demonstrate skill in planning, engagement, assessment, and reflection upon student learning; and collect evidence of performance that connects with standards and criteria for pre-service teachers. Through successful completion of student teaching, candidates demonstrate endorsement competencies required for residency teacher certification with an Elementary Education K-8 endorsement. Candidates seeking an approved second endorsement in this course must also demonstrate competencies of the second endorsement. Prerequisite: Pass state-required endorsement test(s)

Elementary Education and Reading (181)

Elementary Education Core Requirements

EDE 307

Special Education and Special Programs (3)

This course provides general education teachers with the knowledge and skills to address the needs of students with disabilities in their classrooms. The course also surveys other special programs including ESL/Bilingual, gifted education, and federal, state, and local compensatory programs and services. The course offers a holistic perspective of the range of human experience of special needs students, attitudes of individuals and society toward these individuals, and strategies for building a sense of classroom community to engage all students in meeting academic and interpersonal goals. In addition, this course provides opportunities for learning about collaborative models for involving families as well as other professionals in planning for students with special needs. Participants use role playing, observation, interviewing, and group investigations to learn about interventions and accommodations appropriate for K-8 students with special needs.

EDE 325

Sustainability and the Social Sciences (4)

This course focuses on a project-based approach to teaching the social sciences while establishing opportunities for direct classroom application and transformative student learning. Emphasis is placed on the integration of the social, ecological and economic dimensions of sustainability. Candidates learn to incorporate project-based pedagogy theory and practice and how best to implement them into classroom instruction.

EDE 370A

Content: Creative Arts Concepts (2)

This course focuses on the basic elements, principles, related concepts, and vocabulary of the creative arts. Emphasis is placed on developing the candidate's familiarity with a variety of art forms and how to integrate them into inter-disciplinary lesson plans and unit plans. Candidates will be able to effectively integrate the arts into planning academic curricula for K-8 classrooms.

EDE 403

Health and Fitness Methods (2)

This course provides an understanding of the potential empowering or limiting effects of health/fitness choices and habits on quality of life, health, and lifespan. Topics include exploration into health-related topics as well as candidate development of teaching skills necessary for effective health education and application of physical activities that promote fitness in the K-8 student learning environment.

Reading Core Requirements

ERL 413

Integrating Literacy in Content Areas (5)

This course examines strategies for integrating literacy into the content areas. Topics include meta-cognitive strategies for informational and expository text, text features, the use of technology in adolescent literacy instruction, and vocabulary instructional strategies. Upon completion of this course, candidates can effectively teach literacy skills in each of the content areas to adolescent learners using informational, expository, functional, and task-specific texts. Prerequisites: Admission to the CityU Teacher Certification Program dual endorsement program, accessibility to P-12 students and/or classrooms; or valid Washington State initial, residency, continuing, professional teaching certificate or valid National Board Teaching certification; accessibility to P-12 students and/or classrooms.

ERL 414

Literacy Applications In The Classroom (5)

This course is the application of literacy instructional skills with P-12 students. Topics include materials selection, diagnosis, planning, assessment, analysis interpretation, and evaluation of literary and expository texts. Upon completion of this course, candidates can effectively assess, diagnose, and plan appropriate intervention for students struggling in reading. Prerequisite: Per program plan, plan of study, or approval of program director.

ERL 417

Literacy Instructions: Meeting the Needs of All Learners (4)

This course examines fluency and family involvement in children's literacy development. Topics include instructional intervention, motivating reluctant readers, literature circles, welcoming parents as partners, and strategies for word recognition. Upon completion of this course, candidates can effectively modify literacy instruction to meet individual student needs and create meaningful opportunities for family involvement and support of literacy development.

Combined Requirements

EDE 433

Content: Mathematics I (4)

EDE 433 is the first of two courses that examine theoretical perspectives on mathematics education and methods of teaching and learning mathematics at the elementary and middle school levels. Candidates acquire and demonstrate practical experience in the understanding of the mathematics concepts and methods taught in grades K-8. In this course, candidates investigate various teaching strategies to motivate children, explore what it means to know and do mathematics, to solve problems, to use assessment to inform instruction, and to teach math equitably to all children.

EDE 439

Content: Mathematics II (4)

EDE 439 is the second of two math methods courses that examine theoretical perspectives on mathematics education and methods of teaching and learning mathematics at the elementary and middle school levels. Candidates acquire and demonstrate practical experience in the understanding of the mathematics concepts and methods taught in grades K-8. In this second course, candidates investigate various teaching strategies to motivate students, explore what it means to know and do mathematics, to solve problems, to use assessment to inform instruction, and to teach math equitably to all children.

EDU 308

American School Law and Issues in Special Populations (3)

This course examines public school law with an emphasis on the rights and responsibilities of students and teachers. Candidates analyze current issues and case studies specific to public education, special education and the education of recent immigrants for positive inclusion in a public school. Candidates learn professional boundaries, procedures, and resources to maintain a safe environment for teaching and learning.

EDU 313

Multicultural Education (2)

This course provides an introduction to the diversity of the American school population and the concepts, theories, and strategies that constitute multicultural education. Participants explore how children from diverse backgrounds construct knowledge within the contexts of their own socio-cultural backgrounds and how such diversity affects how the students are perceived in the classroom. Issues such as equity, race, ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, language, disability, and other special circumstances are explored. This course promotes the candidate’s sensitivity, acceptance, and ability to self-reflect in regards to issues related to diversity and inspires the candidate to do the same with his/her students.

EDU 320A

Content: Instructional Strategies P-12 (5)

This course examines the basic principles of quality instructional design and delivery. Topics include personalized learning as well as instructional strategies that promote learning experiences and enable both teacher and student to monitor learning progress. Candidates develop foundational understandings of how to prepare to teach a class when they have their own classrooms.

EDU 329

Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (4)

This course guides teacher certification candidates to demonstrate competency in inquiry-based approach to teaching STEM that emphasizes problem-solving and hands-on learning. Participants apply the cycle of inquiry to the essential components of science, technology, engineering and math: concepts, knowledge, understanding, skills, reasoning, product development and dispositions. The course provides opportunities for direct classroom application and transformative student learning.

EDU 383A

Content: Classroom Management (3)

This course is an introduction to theories and practice of classroom management. Emphasis is placed on candidate practice of skills and strategies necessary to establish and maintain classroom communities that will support student learning and human relationships.

EDU 404A

Content: Student Assessment and Evaluation (3)

This course is a required foundations course for all candidates in the Bachelor of Arts in Education Teacher Preparation Program. The course focuses on the usage of assessment in educational decision making as well as formative and summative classroom assessment and the necessary foundations, strategies, and understandings to assess and evaluation student learning and promote student self-assessment. Emphasis is placed on the skills necessary to make data-driven decisions and how these decisions impact instruction, curriculum, and services. Practical application of this knowledge will enable the candidate to use assessment in making placement and instructional decisions as well as assist students in the classroom in monitoring and assess their own learning. Prerequisite: Per program plan or plan of study

EDU 495

Positive Impact on Student Learning: Project (1)

As a requirement for completion of degree and certification requirements, in this course the candidate completes an impact on student learning project based on a unit of study developed and taught in conjunction with the Teacher Performance Assessment. Candidates participate in seminars, workshops, and conferences designed to promote quality evidence and timely completion of the project. Each presentation is reviewed by faculty as evidence of the candidate's effectiveness in impacting student learning. Prerequisite: Pass state required endorsement test(s) and departmental approval.

ERL 436

Literacy Instruction and Assessment I (4)

This is the first of three courses in the literacy sequence for the undergraduate Teacher Certification Program. This course provides a foundation for literacy instruction. Topics include reading and writing instruction, response to literature, language acquisition, construction of meaning/comprehension, and strategies for English language learners. Candidates learn strategies for literacy instruction which can be used with all learners. Prerequisite: Per program plan, plan of study or approval of permission of program director

ERL 438

Literacy Instruction and Assessment II (4)

The second of three courses in the literacy sequence for the undergraduate Teacher Certification Program, this course examines a variety of assessment and instructional strategies. Topics include reading comprehension strategies, informational text, complex text, text density, writing and alignment with state standards. Upon completion of this course, candidates are able to effectively assess and teach literacy skills for K-8 students. Course Entry Requirement: Admission to BA in Education program. Course Entry Recommended: ERL 436.

ERL 440

Language Arts and Literacy Integration (4)

This is the last of three courses in the literacy sequence for the undergraduate evidence, evaluate interventions and become an effective researcher. Overall, the systematic collection of data is used to document positive impact on student learning. Note: Please see note on ERL 508.

ESP 370A

Content: Exceptionality in Special Education (4)

The purpose of this course is to inform candidates on both inclusion and specialist paradigms in special education, including definitions of disabilities and program delivery. This course emphasizes identification, specific needs of students, service delivery, and legal issues. Practical application of these principles will form the foundation for future special education courses. Prerequisite: Per program plan, plan of study, or approval of program director.

ESP 409A

Content: Fundamentals of the IEP Process (3)

The purpose of this course is to provide candidates with the compliance elements necessary for writing and implementing a quality Individualized Educational Plan (IEP). This course emphasizes State and Federal mandates, procedural safeguards, IEP content requirements, and parent participation. Upon successful completion of this course, candidates will be able to write an appropriate IEP that meets the needs of students identified with (a) special education need(s).

ESP 423

Curriculum Modifications and Adaptation (2)

This course provides educators with the pedagogical foundations, strategies, and understanding to successfully modify and provide curriculum adaptations within the learning environment for the special needs of exceptional students. Course work and class activities includes topics on classroom arrangements, adaptive equipment, grouping, scheduling, homework materials selection, classroom management accommodations, effective delivery, and adaptation of subject content, as well as ways to foster student social competence and self-determination.

Internship and Student Teaching

EDU 337

Practicum (1)

This course covers effective integration, instructional strategies and assessments of the specific endorsement content area. This course provides the field experience required to meet state clinical requirements. Prerequisite: Pass state required endorsement test(s) and prior departmental approval.

EDU 349

September Experience (1)

In this September Experience, candidates complete the required number of days in a school classroom with guidance from a cooperating mentor teacher and field supervisor. Topics include essential dispositions and skills in planning for instruction, engaging students, and assessing learning. Completion of this introductory internship provides candidates the field-based perspectives and reflection skills needed to understand the tasks the teacher completes prior to students starting school and during the first weeks of the school year. Prerequisite: Preferred completion of the first two field internships unless approved by Director of Teacher Certification Programs.

EDU 350

Introduction to Field Experience (1)

This course focuses on acquainting students with the resources, documents and peer-interaction skills they will use throughout their educational program. Emphasis is placed on becoming familiar with available professional resources, essential professional dispositions and collaboration skills. Practical application of this knowledge will assist students in successfully accessing needed resources during their educational program and developing professional competency.

EDU 351

Internship I (1)

In this first field experience, candidates complete the required number of days in a school classroom with guidance of a cooperating teacher and field supervisor. Topics include essential dispositions and skills in planning for instruction, engaging students, and assessing learning. Completion of this introductory internship provides candidates field-based perspectives and reflection skills needed to improve performance in this and following field experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to the Bachelor of Arts in Education Program or permission of the Director

EDU 352

Internship II (1)

In this second developmental field experience, candidates complete the required number of days of internship in a school classroom with guidance of a cooperating teacher and a field supervisor. Topics include classroom duties; establishing a learning environment; working with individual students, small groups, and the whole-class; collaborative planning, instruction, and assessment; evidence of student learning; and developing collaboration and problem-solving skills. To build capacity regarding residency endorsement competencies, candidates plan and teach lessons or activities, journal reflectively about teaching and learning, pursue a professional development goal based in field performance, and reflect on practice. Prerequisite: Admission to the Bachelor of Arts in Education Program or permission of the Director, and completion of Internship I or equivalent

EDU 353

Internship III (1)

In this third developmental field experience, candidates complete the required number of days of internship in a school classroom with guidance of a cooperating teacher and a field supervisor. Related topics include establishing a learning environment; collaborative planning, instruction, and assessment; evidence of student learning; and developing collaboration and problem-solving skills. To build capacity regarding residency endorsement competencies, candidates plan and teach lessons or activities, journal reflectively about teaching and learning, pursue a professional development goal based in field performance, and reflect on practice. Prerequisite: Admission to the Bachelor of Arts in Education Program or permission of the Director, and completion of Internship II or equivalent

EDU 480

Student Teaching in Elementary Education (10)

In Student Teaching, candidates seeking an Elementary Education K-8 endorsement co-teach with a cooperating teacher in a K-8 school placement for the required number of days to develop and demonstrate capacities to perform the full-time responsibilities of a teacher and to make a positive impact on student learning. During student teaching, candidates exhibit essential dispositions; demonstrate skill in planning, engagement, assessment, and reflection upon student learning; and collect evidence of performance that connects with standards and criteria for pre-service teachers. Through successful completion of student teaching, candidates demonstrate endorsement competencies required for residency teacher certification with an Elementary Education K-8 endorsement. Candidates seeking an approved second endorsement in this course must also demonstrate competencies of the second endorsement. Prerequisite: Pass state-required endorsement test(s)

Special Education and Middle Level Math (192)

Special Education Core Requirements

ESP 370A

Content: Exceptionality in Special Education (4)

The purpose of this course is to inform candidates on both inclusion and specialist paradigms in special education, including definitions of disabilities and program delivery. This course emphasizes identification, specific needs of students, service delivery, and legal issues. Practical application of these principles will form the foundation for future special education courses. Prerequisite: Per program plan, plan of study, or approval of program director.

ESP 373

Special Education: Low-Incidence Students (3)

This course is a study of students identified with low-incidence disabilities such as developmentally delayed, autism spectrum, moderate/severe mental retardation, traumatic brain injury (tbi), orthopedically impaired, deaf/hard of hearing and visually impaired. Components of the course include definitions, family involvement, assessments, instructional methods, procedural, and landmark legal issues in special education. Candidates provide appropriate program accommodations for students identified with a low-incidence disability. Prerequisites: Admittance to the Bachelor of Arts in Education program or prior approval of the Program Director or Senior Faculty is required before students begin this course.

ESP 376

Autism (3)

The purpose of this course is to provide the candidate opportunities to delineate and define autism spectrum disorders (differences and similarities). The course emphasizes knowledge of autism spectrum disorders with regard to severity and intensity and other characteristics unique to each disorder. Candidates apply information learned in this course to meet the educational aspects of students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Prerequisites: Admittance to the Bachelor of Arts in Education program or prior approval of the Program Director or Senior Faculty is required before students begin this course.

ESP 405

Behavior Analysis and Management (3)

The purpose of this course is to provide candidates opportunities to explore models for analyzing and managing student behavior. The course emphasizes basic types of student behavior, motivation, prevention strategies, intervention strategies and behavior change plans. Practical application of these principles will be demonstrated through the completion of data collection samples, a functional behavioral assessment, positive behavior support plan, and emergency response protocols for use of restraint and/or isolation interventions. Prerequisite: Admittance to BAEd or Endorsement-Only program or prior departmental approval.

ESP 408

Student Assessment and Evaluation (3)

This course focuses on the necessary foundations, strategies and understanding to successfully perform assessments and evaluations in the classroom for placement and implementation of programs for students receiving special education services. Emphasis is placed on the selection of appropriate assessment and evaluation tools, timelines and the interrelationship between assessment components. Candidates demonstrate selection of appropriate assessment tool and accurately interpret data used in the assessment process for qualification and implementation of individual programs for students receiving special education services.

ESP 409A

Content: Fundamentals of the IEP Process (3)

The purpose of this course is to provide candidates with the compliance elements necessary for writing and implementing a quality Individualized Educational Plan (IEP). This course emphasizes State and Federal mandates, procedural safeguards, IEP content requirements, and parent participation. Upon successful completion of this course, candidates will be able to write an appropriate IEP that meets the needs of students identified with (a) special education need(s).

Mathematics Core Requirements

EML 435

Mathematics: Number Sense and Theory (3)

Math endorsement candidates develop a conceptual understanding of and procedural facility with operations, number systems, ratios, and proportional relationships. Topics include the structure, properties, characteristics of and relationships between number systems including whole numbers, integers, rational, real, and complex numbers; operations of different number systems and their properties; representation, modeling, properties, and operations of vectors and matrices; the progression of learning that begins with the base-ten number system and operations thereof, builds into understanding of and operations with fractions and rational numbers, and extends to understandings of and operations with real numbers; ratios and proportional relationships, including additive and multiplicative perspectives; ratios, rates, and proportions; representation and analysis of proportional relationships using tables, graphs, equations, diagrams, concrete and mathematical models; and verbal description.

EML 445

Mathematics: Geometry and Measurement (3)

Math endorsement candidates develop conceptual understanding of geometric properties and relationships as they apply to congruence, similarity, geometric figures, and the Cartesian Coordinate System. Topics include modeling and solving real life and mathematical problems involving proof of theorems; congruence, similarity, and transformations; physical and technological constructions; lines, angle measure, area, surface area, and volume; classification, visualization, and description of two-dimensional figures and three-dimensional objects and the relationships among them; rigid motion; Pythagorean Theorem; angles, radii, arcs, chords, sectors of circles, and conic sections. Upon successful completion of this course, candidates have content knowledge to help K-12 students become college and career ready in geometry and measurement.

EML 481

Standards of Mathematics Practice (3)

Math endorsement students acquire functional understandings of the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics for content and pedagogy. Students focus on standards of mathematics practice, key shifts in mathematics, how students learn and do not learn math, collaborative teams, culturally responsive teaching, and Smarter Balance assessment. Students apply these learnings to specific math topics in the following content and pedagogy courses for the ultimate purpose of helping K-12 students become college and workplace ready in mathematics.

EML 482

Algebra and Functions (3)

Math endorsement candidates develop conceptual understanding of and procedural facility with algebra concepts emphasizing functions. Topics include operations, solution, and graphical representation of real life and mathematical problems using numerical and algebraic expressions, equations, and inequalities; proportional relationships, lines, and linear equations; functional notation and their models (linear, quadratic, simple rational, and exponential); algebreic expressions and functions (polynomials, rationals, roots); arithmetic properties and their proofs, equivalent forms; analysis and modeling of functions (linear, quadratic, exponential, trigonometric); and relationships between various representations of a function (graphs, tables, algebraic expressions, concrete models, contexts). Upon successful completion of this course, candidates have content knowledge to help K-12 students become college and career ready in algebra and functions.

EML 485

Mathematics: Probability and Statistics (3)

Math endorsements candidates develop conceptual understanding of an procedural facility with statistics and probability. Topics include summarizing, representing, and interpreting categorical and quantitative data; measures of central tendency, distributions, evaluation of random processes, populations and random sampling, randomization; single variable, multivariate, categorical, and continuous data; binomial probability distributions; the principles of probability; probability of compound events using technology to collect, represent, and analyze data; and using rules of probability to model, make predictions, evaluate decisions, and solve real world problems. Upon successful completion of this course, math endorsement candidates have content knowledge to help K-12 students become college and career ready in probability and statistics.

EML 490

Teaching Mathematics: Bringing It All Together (3)

Math endorsement candidates build skills in effective integration, instructional strategies, and assessments of mathematics in a secondary or middle school classroom. This course also provides candidates with a review of the content necessary to pass the WEST-E mathematics endorsement exam. Upon successful completion, candidates have improved skills needed to help make K-12 students college and career ready in mathematics.

Combined Requirements

EDE 433

Content: Mathematics I (4)

EDE 433 is the first of two courses that examine theoretical perspectives on mathematics education and methods of teaching and learning mathematics at the elementary and middle school levels. Candidates acquire and demonstrate practical experience in the understanding of the mathematics concepts and methods taught in grades K-8. In this course, candidates investigate various teaching strategies to motivate children, explore what it means to know and do mathematics, to solve problems, to use assessment to inform instruction, and to teach math equitably to all children.

EDE 439

Content: Mathematics II (4)

EDE 439 is the second of two math methods courses that examine theoretical perspectives on mathematics education and methods of teaching and learning mathematics at the elementary and middle school levels. Candidates acquire and demonstrate practical experience in the understanding of the mathematics concepts and methods taught in grades K-8. In this second course, candidates investigate various teaching strategies to motivate students, explore what it means to know and do mathematics, to solve problems, to use assessment to inform instruction, and to teach math equitably to all children.

EDU 308

American School Law and Issues in Special Populations (3)

This course examines public school law with an emphasis on the rights and responsibilities of students and teachers. Candidates analyze current issues and case studies specific to public education, special education and the education of recent immigrants for positive inclusion in a public school. Candidates learn professional boundaries, procedures, and resources to maintain a safe environment for teaching and learning.

EDU 313

Multicultural Education (2)

This course provides an introduction to the diversity of the American school population and the concepts, theories, and strategies that constitute multicultural education. Participants explore how children from diverse backgrounds construct knowledge within the contexts of their own socio-cultural backgrounds and how such diversity affects how the students are perceived in the classroom. Issues such as equity, race, ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, language, disability, and other special circumstances are explored. This course promotes the candidate’s sensitivity, acceptance, and ability to self-reflect in regards to issues related to diversity and inspires the candidate to do the same with his/her students.

EDU 320A

Content: Instructional Strategies P-12 (5)

This course examines the basic principles of quality instructional design and delivery. Topics include personalized learning as well as instructional strategies that promote learning experiences and enable both teacher and student to monitor learning progress. Candidates develop foundational understandings of how to prepare to teach a class when they have their own classrooms.

EDU 329

Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (4)

This course guides teacher certification candidates to demonstrate competency in inquiry-based approach to teaching STEM that emphasizes problem-solving and hands-on learning. Participants apply the cycle of inquiry to the essential components of science, technology, engineering and math: concepts, knowledge, understanding, skills, reasoning, product development and dispositions. The course provides opportunities for direct classroom application and transformative student learning.

EDU 383A

Content: Classroom Management (3)

This course is an introduction to theories and practice of classroom management. Emphasis is placed on candidate practice of skills and strategies necessary to establish and maintain classroom communities that will support student learning and human relationships.

EDU 404A

Content: Student Assessment and Evaluation (3)

This course is a required foundations course for all candidates in the Bachelor of Arts in Education Teacher Preparation Program. The course focuses on the usage of assessment in educational decision making as well as formative and summative classroom assessment and the necessary foundations, strategies, and understandings to assess and evaluation student learning and promote student self-assessment. Emphasis is placed on the skills necessary to make data-driven decisions and how these decisions impact instruction, curriculum, and services. Practical application of this knowledge will enable the candidate to use assessment in making placement and instructional decisions as well as assist students in the classroom in monitoring and assess their own learning. Prerequisite: Per program plan or plan of study

EDU 495

Positive Impact on Student Learning: Project (1)

As a requirement for completion of degree and certification requirements, in this course the candidate completes an impact on student learning project based on a unit of study developed and taught in conjunction with the Teacher Performance Assessment. Candidates participate in seminars, workshops and conferences designed to promote quality evidence and timely completion of the project. Each presentation is reviewed by faculty as evidence of the candidate's effectiveness in impacting student learning. Prerequisite: Pass state required endorsement test(s) and departmental approval.

ERL 436

Literacy Instruction and Assessment I (4)

This is the first of three courses in the literacy sequence for the undergraduate Teacher Certification Program. This course provides a foundation for literacy instruction. Topics include reading and writing instruction, response to literature, language acquisition, construction of meaning/comprehension, and strategies for English language learners. Candidates learn strategies for literacy instruction which can be used with all learners. Prerequisite: Per program plan, plan of study or approval of permission of program director

ERL 438

Literacy Instruction and Assessment II (4)

The second of three courses in the literacy sequence for the undergraduate Teacher Certification Program, this course examines a variety of assessment and instructional strategies. Topics include reading comprehension strategies, informational text, complex text, text density, writing and alignment with state standards. Upon completion of this course, candidates are able to effectively assess and teach literacy skills for K-8 students. Course Entry Requirement: Admission to BA in Education program. Course Entry Recommended: ERL 436.

ERL 440

Language Arts and Literacy Integration (4)

This is the last of three courses in the literacy sequence for the undergraduate evidence, evaluate interventions and become an effective researcher. Overall, the systematic collection of data is used to document positive impact on student learning. Note: Please see note on ERL 508.

ESP 423

Curriculum Modifications and Adaptation (2)

This course provides educators with the pedagogical foundations, strategies, and understanding to successfully modify and provide curriculum adaptations within the learning environment for the special needs of exceptional students. Course work and class activities includes topics on classroom arrangements, adaptive equipment, grouping, scheduling, homework materials selection, classroom management accommodations, effective delivery, and adaptation of subject content, as well as ways to foster student social competence and self-determination.

Internship and Student Teaching

EDU 349

September Experience (1)

In this September Experience, candidates complete the required number of days in a school classroom with guidance from a cooperating mentor teacher and field supervisor. Topics include essential dispositions and skills in planning for instruction, engaging students, and assessing learning. Completion of this introductory internship provides candidates the field-based perspectives and reflection skills needed to understand the tasks the teacher completes prior to students starting school and during the first weeks of the school year. Prerequisite: Preferred completion of the first two field internships unless approved by Director of Teacher Certification Programs.

EDU 350

Introduction to Field Experience (1)

This course focuses on acquainting students with the resources, documents and peer-interaction skills they will use throughout their educational program. Emphasis is placed on becoming familiar with available professional resources, essential professional dispositions and collaboration skills. Practical application of this knowledge will assist students in successfully accessing needed resources during their educational program and developing professional competency.

EDU 351

Internship I (1)

In this first field experience, candidates complete the required number of days in a school classroom with guidance of a cooperating teacher and field supervisor. Topics include essential dispositions and skills in planning for instruction, engaging students, and assessing learning. Completion of this introductory internship provides candidates field-based perspectives and reflection skills needed to improve performance in this and following field experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to the Bachelor of Arts in Education Program or permission of the Director

EDU 352

Internship II (1)

In this second developmental field experience, candidates complete the required number of days of internship in a school classroom with guidance of a cooperating teacher and a field supervisor. Topics include classroom duties; establishing a learning environment; working with individual students, small groups, and the whole-class; collaborative planning, instruction, and assessment; evidence of student learning; and developing collaboration and problem-solving skills. To build capacity regarding residency endorsement competencies, candidates plan and teach lessons or activities, journal reflectively about teaching and learning, pursue a professional development goal based in field performance, and reflect on practice. Prerequisite: Admission to the Bachelor of Arts in Education Program or permission of the Director, and completion of Internship I or equivalent

EDU 353

Internship III (1)

In this third developmental field experience, candidates complete the required number of days of internship in a school classroom with guidance of a cooperating teacher and a field supervisor. Related topics include establishing a learning environment; collaborative planning, instruction, and assessment; evidence of student learning; and developing collaboration and problem-solving skills. To build capacity regarding residency endorsement competencies, candidates plan and teach lessons or activities, journal reflectively about teaching and learning, pursue a professional development goal based in field performance, and reflect on practice. Prerequisite: Admission to the Bachelor of Arts in Education Program or permission of the Director, and completion of Internship II or equivalent

EDU 493

Student Teaching (7)

In Student Teaching, candidates seeking an endorsement co-teach with a cooperating teacher in a school placement for a minimum of 60 days to develop and demonstrate capacities to perform the full-time responsibilities of a teacher and to make a positive impact on student learning. During student teaching, candidates exhibit essential dispositions; demonstrate skill in planning, engagement, assessment and reflection upon student learning; and collect evidence of performance that connects with standards and criteria for pre-service teachers. Through successful completion of student teaching, candidates demonstrate endorsement competencies required for residency teacher certification. Course Entry Requirements: 1) Pass the WEST-E(s) for the endorsement(s) sought and relevant to the placement; 2) Pass all course requirements with 2.0 or higher grade; 3) Pass internships leading to student teaching; 4) Achieve a 2.5 or higher cumulative GPA; 5) Accept school assignment as arranged by Placement Coordinator.

ESP 465

Transitions, Teaming and Collaboration (1)

The purpose of this course is for the teacher candidate to understand the collaborative relationships with other educators in the educational setting, inclusion of family members as part of the team, and working with schools/agencies for successful transitions. Topics include techniques to supervise paraprofessionals, transitions, meeting diversity and multicultural needs. Candidates will be able to facilitate meetings involving all appropriate participants and develop successful transition plans. Prerequisites: Entry to Special Education teacher endorsement program.

ESP 485

Student Teaching in Special Education (9)

In Student Teaching, candidates seeking an Special Education P-12 endorsement co-teach with a cooperating teacher in a school special education placement for the required number of days to develop and demonstrate capacities to perform the full-time responsibilities of a teacher and to make a positive impact on student learning. During student teaching, candidates exhibit essential dispositions; demonstrate skill in planning, engagement, assessment, and reflection upon student learning; and collect evidence of performance that connects with standards and criteria for pre-service teachers. Through successful completion of student teaching, candidates demonstrate endorsement competencies required for residency teacher certification with a Special Education P-12 endorsement. Candidates seeking an approved second endorsement in this course must also demonstrate competencies of the second endorsement. Prerequisite: Pass the state required test for SPED endorsement and approval of program director

Courses subject to change, speak to an advisor if you have questions.
**Plus 90 credits of Lower-Division Requirements.

Teaching is a challenging yet highly rewarding career. If you’re passionate about working with youth and making a difference, a Bachelor of Arts in Education from CityU of Seattle will set you on that path.

This bachelor’s program will prepare you for a variety of roles in the education field, including:

  • Special education teacher
  • Guidance counselor
  • K-12 teacher
  • Single-subject math, reading, or ELL teacher

Networking Opportunities

At CityU, you’ll have the opportunity to expand your professional network by connecting with faculty working in your field, students from around the globe, and alumni employed at Seattle’s top companies. Plus, you’ll be part of a supportive community that’s dedicated to helping you reach your career goals.

Tuition Cost

Learn more about tuition and fees for our undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral programs.

Financial Aid Opportunities

At CityU, we’re committed to helping students achieve their academic goals no matter their economic situations. Our financial aid counselors are here to find the resources you need to pay for your education, including grants, loans, work study, and scholarships.

Learn more about financial aid opportunities at CityU, or contact our Financial Aid Team at 800.426.5596, 206.239.4540, or finaid@cityu.edu.

Military Tuition Benefits

As a Yellow Ribbon school, CityU is proud to serve those who have served in the military. We offer military tuition discounts for active-duty servicemembers and their spouses and accept military benefits such as the Post 9/11 GI Bill® and Tuition Assistance.

Learn more about military tuition benefits, VA benefits, and military partnership programs designed to help you reach your military and career goals.

REQUEST INFORMATION