Advance Your Career in Accounting

The Master of Professional Accounting at City University of Seattle will prepare you to pursue a career in accounting and offer the master’s-level experience you need to be competitive in the job market. The curriculum of this program serves as excellent preparation for necessary exams, including the CPA, CMA, and CGMA.

In this program, you are able to study at your own pace by taking one, two, or three courses per quarter, and on your own schedule with online courses. We offer smaller class sizes, so faculty members (who are also practicing professionals) can get to know you and offer guidance and mentoring throughout the program.

CityU’s Master in Accounting program is unique because it will equip you with a wide breadth and depth of knowledge. In addition to developing core accounting skills, you’ll have the opportunity to choose two specialization areas from topics, including management accounting, finance, international business, CPA review, and information security audit. By concentrating on multiple disciplines, you’ll be better prepared to adjust to changes in the industry.

Learning Outcomes

Throughout the MPA program, you’ll learn to:

  • Apply relevant accounting, audit, law, and tax principles when preparing, analyzing, and presenting information
  • Appraise information and results to identify problems, solutions, and opportunities
  • Communicate clearly, concisely, and persuasively while listening and synthesizing input
  • Critique business information with a global and diverse perspective
  • Evaluate the ethical implications of business decisions
  • Research relevant accounting, tax, and business information to guide business decisions

Prerequisite Courses

AC 215

Fundamentals of Accounting (5)

This course emphasizes the preparation and recording of accounting information and is intended for students majoring in accounting. Students will learn about of the accounting cycle, the measuring process and the classification of data, and the accounting terminology that is essential to the preparation and effective use of financial principles that apply to statements. This course introduces basic accounting concepts and techniques; fundamentals of the accounting process and preparation of basic financial statements; accounting principles involved in the measurement and reporting of assets and liabilities; elements of consolidated statements and statement of cash flows; and using and interpreting financial statements for decision-making. Prerequisites: Strong math and algebra skills in addition to logical thinking are required to succeed in this course.

AC 301

Intermediate Accounting I (5)

AC 301 provides an in-depth examination of the theory and practice of financial accounting, including the accounting environment and underlying conceptual framework. Students will learn about Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and the application of those principles in the preparation of financial information. This course includes the detailed study of the four major financial statements, cash, receivables, inventories, and applications of time value of money concepts. Prerequisite: AC 215 - Fundamentals of Accounting or equivalent.

AC 302

Intermediate Accounting II (5)

AC 302 is the second of three intermediate accounting courses and continues the in-depth examination of the theory and practice of financial accounting. This course concentrates on the accounting for non-current assets, current and long-term liabilities, contributed capital, retained earnings, temporary and long-term investments, and Earnings Per Share (EPS) calculations. Students will learn to account for these items through researching and applying Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). Prerequisite: AC 301 - Intermediate Accounting I or equivalent.

AC 303

Intermediate Accounting III (5)

Intermediate Accounting III is the third of three intermediate accounting courses which continues to expand the in-depth examination of theory and practice of financial accounting. This course concentrates on the preparation and analysis of the statement of cash flows, financial statement analysis, treatment of accounting changes and error analysis, disclosure requirements, revenue recognition, accounting for income taxes, leases, pensions, and post-requirement benefits. Students will focus on the accounting principles and concepts governing the reporting of these items according to Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). Prerequisite: AC 302 - Intermediate Accounting II or equivalent.

Program Core

AC 550

Auditing Theory and Practice (3)

This course focuses on the audit theory pertaining to the examination of financial statements of publicly held companies in an attest function engagement employing Generally Accepted Auditing Standards. Assignments and cases will lead students through the steps of audit planning, implementation, and reporting.

AC 553

Advanced Accounting Strategy I (3)

Advanced Accounting Strategies I takes the student through an in-depth study of financial accounting and accounting research on four major areas in financial reporting: accounting for mergers and acquisitions, preparation of consolidated financial statements, the translation of foreign currency financial statements and foreign currency transactions, and accounting for derivatives including the use of derivatives in hedging transactions. There is a brief overview of disaggregation of financial reports into operating segment information. The course emphasizes interpreting and applying professional accounting standards.

AC 555

Advanced Accounting Strategy II (3)

Advanced Accounting Strategies II, AC 555, continues the in-depth study of financial accounting and accounting research and applies these strategies to accounting and reporting for partnerships, governmental, and nonprofit entities. Topics include partnership admission, dissolution, and liquidation, accounting for state and local governments, and private not-for-profit organizations. The course emphasizes interpreting and applying professional accounting standards to these special types of organizations. Prerequisite: AC 553 - Advanced Accounting Strategies I.

AC 557

Corporate Taxation (3)

AC 557, Corporate Taxation, focuses on the tax consequences, tax problems, and tax planning strategies involving formation, operation, and dissolution of corporations in the context of the US income tax system. In this course, students will learn how to incorporate income tax impacts and related planning into corporate decision-making. Although this is not primarily a tax preparation course, students will have an opportunity to prepare corporate income tax returns and related forms and schedules.

AC 559

Business Law for Accountants (3)

This course is an accelerated review of the legal environment of business with emphasis on contracts, commercial transactions and agency. The course is designed to introduce and reinforce legal vernacular and legal term of art often found on the CPA examination.

AC 563

Capstone - Ethics and Leadership in the Practice of Accounting (3)

Ethics and Leadership in the Practice of Accounting, is designed to prepare the student to be a leader in ethical decision-making in the practice of accounting. Making ethical business decisions requires application of highly developed critical thinking skills. The course will cover major systems of ethical decision-making, ethical standards promulgated by accounting organizations, and business and accounting practices or systems designed to enhance ethical decision-making and to prevent, detect, and/or correct unethical behavior. Special emphasis will be given to making decisions in the face of conflicting values or stakeholder impacts. This is a capstone course and will review and access the program outcomes for the MPAc program. Students will critique ethical principles in business and accounting in line with those outcomes. Prerequisite: AC 563 is a capstone course and should be the last course taken in the MPAc program core.

MBA 540

Strategic Financial Management (3)

This course examines the theory and practice of business finance from a decision-maker's perspective. Using quantitative and qualitative tools, students will recommend company strategy relating to capital structure, sources of short-term and long-term capital, and asset management, based on both internal analyses and the influence of financial markets and institutions. Practical applications will help students understand how financial management supports other components of a firm's overall business strategy. The course explores the different methods of presenting financial information to a range of audiences and the special challenges involved in managing the finances of international firms.

Depth Block (24)

Each student takes two blocks.

Public Accounting

AC 530

CPA Review - Financial Accounting and Reporting (FAR) (3)

This course provides a review of technical accounting materials and helps students explore the opportunities and challenges of being a CPA. Technical coverage of topics historically addressed in the 'Financial Accounting & Reporting' section of the Uniform Certified Public Accounting (CPA) examination is addressed using Becker materials. Students gain knowledge and understanding of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) in relation to business entities, government entities, and not-for-profit organizations and apply knowledge using analytical skills and evaluation techniques. Professional development is encouraged through student interaction. Prerequisites: Students must have completed a major in accounting at the undergraduate or graduate level before registering for this course. A major in accounting consists of courses in the intermediate accounting series, audit, business law, tax, and management accounting. Courses must be, at a minimum, at the 300 level or higher if undergraduate courses or MBA courses. Courses should begin with the letters 'AC' or 'ACC' and be intended for accounting majors.

AC 531

CPA Review - Regulation (REG) (3)

This course provides a review of technical auditing materials and helps students explore the opportunities and challenges of being a CPA. Technical coverage of topics historically addressed in the 'Regulation' section of the Uniform Certified Public Accounting (CPA) examination is addressed using Becker materials. Students gain knowledge and understanding of business law, professional ethics, legal responsibilities, and federal taxation and apply knowledge using analytical skills and evaluation techniques. Professional development is encouraged through student interaction. Prerequisites: Students must have completed a major in accounting at the undergraduate or graduate level before registering for this course. A major in accounting consists of courses in the intermediate accounting series, audit, business law, tax, and management accounting. Courses must be, at a minimum, at the 300 level or higher if undergraduate courses or MBA courses. Courses should begin with the letters 'AC' or 'ACC' and be intended for accounting majors.

AC 532

CPA Review - Auditing and Attestation (AUD) (3)

This course provides a review of technical auditing materials and helps students explore the opportunities and challenges of being a CPA. Technical coverage of topics historically addressed in the 'Auditing and Attestation' section of the Uniform Certified Public Accounting (CPA) examination are addressed using Becker materials. Students gain knowledge and understanding of Generally Accepted Auditing Standards (GAAS) in relation to auditing and attestation engagements and apply knowledge using analytical skills and evaluation techniques. Professional development is encouraged through student interaction. Prerequisites: Students must have completed a major in accounting at the undergraduate or graduate level before registering for this course. A major in accounting consists of courses in the intermediate accounting series, audit, business law, tax, and management accounting. Courses must be, at a minimum, at the 300 level or higher if undergraduate courses or MBA courses. Courses should begin with the letters 'AC' or 'ACC' and be intended for accounting majors.

AC 533

CPA Review - Business Environment and Concepts (BEC) (3)

This course provides a review of technical auditing materials and helps students explore the opportunities and challenges of being a CPA. Technical coverage of topics historically addressed in the 'Business Environment and Concepts' section of the Uniform Certified Public Accounting (CPA) examination is addressed using Becker materials. Students gain knowledge and understanding of business environment as a whole in conjunction with analyzing the specific operations of a business and apply knowledge using analytical skills and evaluation techniques. Professional development is encouraged through student interaction. Prerequisites: Students must have completed a major in accounting at the undergraduate or graduate level before registering for this course. A major in accounting consists of courses in the intermediate accounting series, audit, business law, tax, and management accounting. Courses must be, at a minimum, at the 300 level or higher if undergraduate courses or MBA courses. Courses should begin with the letters 'AC' or 'ACC' and be intended for accounting majors.

Information Security Audit

AC 540

Auditing Techniques (3)

This course focuses on the methodology for auditing system controls and provides the fundamental concepts of auditing to help students explore the opportunities and challenges of being an information system auditor. Students will study auditing processes and technology involved with modern computer systems as well as obtain an understanding of risks, control objectives, and standards. The course examines the importance of internal controls and of audit planning to obtain appropriate evidence to prepare an audit report.

ISEC 500

Information Security Overview (3)

This course will cover changes in information security management and understanding. The age of information security as technology alone has passed, people currently involved with information security need to understand the entire information security landscape, from rules, laws, corporate laws and rules, decision making, working in teams, leadership, and other ways that information security is changing people and the work place.

ISEC 605

Information Security Auditing (3)

This course focuses on the methodology for auditing information security system controls and assists students in exploring the opportunities and challenges of being an information system auditor. The course explains the technology and auditing involved with securing modern computer systems, as well as, providing an understanding of risks, control objectives and standards. This course examines how companies ensure information security is protecting their information assets from hackers and others who desire to harm the organization.

ITMGMT 570

Maintaining the Technology Infrastructure (3)

Designing, developing, implementing and installing a technology infrastructure is a complex process, however the real challenge is in maintaining that infrastructure in a manner that provides a high level of reliability and availability while providing effective support for the end users. This course examines how ITIL and other frameworks combine best practices and standardized processes and procedures to enable an effective service infrastructure. Students will gain experience in the planning, coordination and management skills needed to manage or work with an IT service organization.

Finance

FIN 541

Capital Formation and Corporate Management (3)

In this class students will understand and be able to analyze the appropriate use of methods of capital formation. The Financing of new and growing ventures has, along with most economic activity become global as well as local in scope. Venture Capital firms, Angel Investors, Capital Management Companies, Investment Banks, and other entities now operate everywhere, and their impact on capital formation and corporate management is profound. In addition to describing how these methods of capital formation function, this course will survey the methods used to implement mergers and buyouts when they are adopted as part of a company's strategy. Prerequisites: MBA 535.

FIN 542

Banking and the Movement of Capital (3)

In this course students will learn the role of banking in business development and management. From the use of micro-loans in developing economies, through local and regional service banks, to the role of national and multi-national institutions, students will learn how banks function. Special topics will include investment banks and the function of institutions such as the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank. The global flow of capital, in part facilitated through the back offices of global banks, has tied the world's economies. Prerequisites: MBA 540.

FIN 543

Equity Markets and Debt Instrument Management (3)

In this course, students take a comprehensive look at how markets are organized and how trading occurs. Students will gain understanding of the framework for how existing markets are established, how trading occurs in them, and how they evolve over time. Students learn how the markets in securities and capital investments function, how to value a security, how to create and manage a portfolio, and the role of debt instruments in finance. Finally, the dynamics of behavioral finance, and its effect on trading and value, will be studied. Prerequisite: MBA 540

FIN 544

Financial Management of Public and Not-For-Profit Organizations (3)

In this course the student will explore key finance issues in public organizations and not for profit corporations. The broad content will include public sector bonding and levying fees, to the role of philanthropy funding in major Non-Governmental Organization [NGO] operations. Different methods of budgeting and accounting from corporate methods will also be presented. The role of finance in the public and not for profit sectors has become central to the stability of the world economy. On the local level, governments and not for profit corporations provide critical services. Internationally, NGOs play major roles in mediating key global problems. Governments financed projects, from the Five Gorges Dam in China, to the new tide regulation project in Venice and to the rebuilding of Port infrastructure in Seattle, have wide ranging local and global impacts. Prerequisites: MBA 535 or applicable prior experience in accounting, MBA 540.

Global Management

MAL 558

High-Performing Global Teams (3)

Leaders require skills to effectively collaborate within a multi-cultural environment, evaluate culturally diverse talent, communicate team goals, and foster global team interactions. To compete globally, leaders need to learn practical leadership strategies for building cohesive, motivated, high-performing, global teams. Students will explore team-building strategies effective in virtual and global environments.

MBA 546

European Union (3)

This course is designed to provide a practical perspective on doing business in the European Union. The primary focus will be on the internal market and those policies and institutions which directly affect the economic environment within the EU. The course will examine the harmonization of policies across Europe but also address the diversity of member states and how that fragments the market and affects business and functional-area strategies. Upon completing the course, students will be able to make informed strategic decisions about how businesses can best capitalize on the opportunities that the European market provides. Prerequisites: MBA 500, MBA 501.

MC 573

International Business (3)

All businesses need to understand the current international business environment. From a strategic systems perspective, the international market is considered from the viewpoint of competition and emerging opportunities. Internal functional operations need to conform to international requirements with reference to marketing, taxation, finance, management, and labor. This course explores cultural, social and political forces, and governmental regulations that affect strategies and profit.

MC 585

International Human Resource Management (3)

This course covers the optimum organization and employment of human resources to accomplish strategic organizational objectives from a global perspective, with a focus on Europe. Additionally, this course is concerned with the policies and procedures which affect the recruitment, development and deployment of the human resources of firms. The course will address the significant changes which have taken place in this area of management in response to economic and political pressure and will consider policies and practices in various countries.

Management Accounting Applications

AC 501

Applied Management Accounting Concepts I (3)

In AC 501, Applied Management Accounting Concepts I, emphasis is placed on financial reporting decisions, planning, budgeting and forecasting, performance management, cost management, and internal controls. Students will integrate and synthesize their knowledge of cost behaviors and communicate the results. AC 501 and AC 502 concentrate on topics routinely tested on the CMA and CGMA certification examinations and will help students prepare to sit for these exams. Prerequisite: Although a major in accounting or finance is not required to complete this course, students are assumed to have in depth knowledge in the preparation of financial statements, finance, business, economics, time-value of money concepts, statistics, and probability. With regard to U.S. Federal income taxation issues, students will be expected to understand the impact of income taxes in decision-making and when reporting and analyzing financial results.

AC 502

Applied Management Accounting Concepts II (3)

In AC 502, Applied Management Accounting Concepts II, emphasis is placed on financial statement analysis, corporate finance, decision analysis, risk management, investment decisions, and professional ethics. Students will analyze information, evaluate options, make recommendations, and provide information useful to support management decision-making. AC 501 and AC 502 concentrate on topics routinely tested on the CMA and CGMA certification examinations and will help students prepare to sit for these exams. Prerequisite: Although a major in accounting or finance is not required to complete this course, students are assumed to have in depth knowledge in the preparation of financial statements, finance, business, economics, time-value of money concepts, statistics, and probability. With regard to U.S. Federal income taxation issues, students will be expected to understand the impact of income taxes in decision-making and when reporting and analyzing financial results.

FIN 544

Financial Management of Public and Not-For-Profit Organizations (3)

In this course the student will explore key finance issues in public organizations and not for profit corporations. The broad content will include public sector bonding and levying fees, to the role of philanthropy funding in major Non-Governmental Organization [NGO] operations. Different methods of budgeting and accounting from corporate methods will also be presented. The role of finance in the public and not for profit sectors has become central to the stability of the world economy. On the local level, governments and not for profit corporations provide critical services. Internationally, NGOs play major roles in mediating key global problems. Governments financed projects, from the Five Gorges Dam in China, to the new tide regulation project in Venice and to the rebuilding of Port infrastructure in Seattle, have wide ranging local and global impacts. Prerequisites: MBA 535 or applicable prior experience in accounting, MBA 540.

ISEC 500

Information Security Overview (3)

This course will cover changes in information security management and understanding. The age of information security as technology alone has passed, people currently involved with information security need to understand the entire information security landscape, from rules, laws, corporate laws and rules, decision making, working in teams, leadership, and other ways that information security is changing people and the work place.

Businesses in every industry require professionals with a solid understanding of financial and accounting principles. This master’s program opens the door for a career change or career advancement into a leadership role.

The master’s in professional accounting program will prepare you to seek a variety of management and leadership roles, such as:

  • Auditor
  • Chief Financial Officer (CFO)
  • Corporate controller
  • Financial analyst
  • Forensic accountant
  • Information and technology accountant
  • Managerial accountant

Networking Opportunities

At CityU, you’ll have the opportunity to expand your professional network by connecting with faculty working in your field, students from around the globe, and alumni employed at Seattle’s top companies. Plus, you’ll be part of a supportive community that’s dedicated to helping you reach your career goals.

Tuition Cost

Learn more about tuition and fees for our undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral programs.

Financial Aid Opportunities

At CityU, we’re committed to helping students achieve their academic goals no matter their economic situations. Our financial aid counselors are here to find the resources you need to pay for your education, including grants, loans, work study, and scholarships.

Learn more about financial aid opportunities at CityU, or contact our Financial Aid Team at 800.426.5596, 206.239.4540, or finaid@cityu.edu.

Military Tuition Benefits

As a Yellow Ribbon school, CityU is proud to serve those who have served in the military. We offer military tuition discounts for active-duty servicemembers and their spouses and accept military benefits such as the Post 9/11 GI Bill® and Tuition Assistance.

Learn more about military tuition benefits, VA benefits, and military partnership programs designed to help you reach your military and career goals.

REQUEST INFORMATION