Make a Positive Difference

If you have a passion for helping others and want to pursue a career in psychology, counseling, or social work, the Bachelor of Arts in Human Services program at City University of Seattle will provide you with a solid knowledge base and the necessary skills. You’ll learn how to work with individuals, families, and communities, advocate on their behalf, and plan an effective course of treatment to improve quality of life.

The bachelor’s degree in human services program at CityU is fully online, except for the internship experience, and has enrollment every quarter, allowing for maximum flexibility.

The online Bachelor of Arts in Human Services program will equip you with the interdisciplinary knowledge base and social work skills needed to make a positive difference in the lives of individuals, families, and communities. Along with gaining a strong foundation in human services, you’ll choose either a comprehensive program or a specialized study emphasis that allows you to focus your studies around your interests.

Internship

This bachelor's degree in human services program requires students to complete an internship at a human services agency that focuses on your emphasis area. The internship integrates theories learned in the classroom with practical experience at an agency. You’ll work under the supervision of an experienced human service professional, gaining skills and knowledge in the field.

The experience gained and contacts made at internship sites often lead to other professional opportunities.

Faculty

Faculty in the program are practitioners in the field, and the curriculum is multidisciplinary, drawing from psychology, sociology, counseling, social work, criminal justice, and business.

The program is academically rigorous in order to enable you to be competitive for graduate school, as well as practical and skills-based to allow you to qualify for employment after graduation.

Learning Outcomes

Throughout the human services bachelor’s degree program, you’ll learn to:

  • Understand common issues that those with disabilities face
  • Identify and assess client needs and develop treatment plans
  • Advocate for individuals, families, groups, and communities
  • Identify and prepare grants to assist in service delivery
  • Investigate the impact of physical and psychological trauma on individuals, groups, and communities, with particular attention to how post-traumatic stress contributes to the development of co-occurring substance abuse disorders
  • Make ethical decisions and practical applications involving ethical problems
  • Study behavioral pharmacology using a blended approach of pharmacology, neuroscience, and psychology
  • Study human behavior in organizations

Lower-Division Requirements (90)

College Composition: 5 credits
College Mathematics: 5 credits
Humanities: 15 credits
Social Science: 15 credits
Natural Science/Mathematics: 15 credits

Bachelor of Arts in Human Services

Preparatory Courses

HSVC 200

Introduction to Human Services (5)

This course provides an overview and introduction to working in human services. Types of service delivery systems are examined, and the process of helping, including the ethical and legal implications of working with clients is evaluated. Students analyze the professional roles of the human services worker and explore their own professional interests in human services work. Prerequisite: ENG 102 or equivalent

PSY 201

Introduction to Psychology (5)

This course examines the field of psychology from a variety of theoretical perspectives. Topics include: the physiological basis of mental functioning; the physical, cognitive, and social aspects of lifespan development; learning, memory, and cognition; psychological disorders; emotions and health; thinking and language; intelligence and motivation; perception and sensation; and the various theories of personality.

PSY 202

Understanding Human Development (5)

An investigation into the biological, social, and psychological forces that shape the various stages of our lives. The course also examines patterns of difference due to factors such as gender, culture, disability, and socioeconomic status.


PSY 209

Fundamentals of Research Methods in Social Sciences (5)

As an introduction to research methods in social sciences, this course provides a foundation in the basic concepts of scientific method, research design, and statistical analysis. The focus is on empirical approaches to knowledge. This course also addresses the usefulness and limitations of statistical processes and their applications in social sciences. It emphasizes problem formulation, selection of research techniques, and results interpretation. Prerequisite: ENG 102 or Equivalent

PSY 220

Fundamentals of Abnormal Psychology (5)

The course assesses both past and present models of psychological abnormality including the current version of the diagnostic system. Other topics addressed include: problems of anxiety, mood, mind and body, social impact, psychosis, and personality. Specifically, this course serves as an introduction to abnormal psychology, with particular applicability to theories of personality and as a foundation to subsequent coursework in counseling and psychology. The areas addressed are broad, theoretical- and research-based, and of relevance in conceptualizing issues of both nature and extent of abnormal behavior, and the means by which prevention and intervention occurs. Prerequisite: Course Entry Requirements: PSY 201, PSY 202, PSY 240 or PSY 311, PSY 209 or PSY 312, or their equivalent

PSY 240

Critical Thinking & Writing Skills in Social Sciences (5)

This course develops students' writing skills. It introduces students to various forms of scholarly writing and focuses on topics such as style and mechanics, APA format, etc. In this course students will also learn about critical-thinking process used to analyze social issues and identify rational solutions. Topics examined include: argument analyzing and building; forms and standards of critical thinking; and evaluating sources of information. Prerequisite: ENG 102 or Equivalent

Human Services Core

HSVC 370

Providing Services for Clients with Disabilities (5)

This course introduces students to human services practice with people with disabilities. This course will cover a brief review of disabilities and the disability rights movement and will provide an understanding of common issues that those with disabilities face. Students will learn how different perspectives and policies can impact those living with disabilities. The course will cover evidence-based practice in interventions and assessments for clients with disabilities.

HSVC 410

Assessment and Intervention with Diverse Populations (5)

Identifying and assessing client needs and developing treatment plans are core functions of human services professionals. This course engages students in the principles and practice of assessment; in the planning and implementing appropriate treatment strategies and referral services; and in evaluating intervention outcomes. It focuses on the differences and commonalities of serving diverse communities, in terms of ethnicity, culture, national origin, gender, and sexual orientation. This course will also include content and assignments related to the human services internship. Students must pass this course with a 2.5 GPA and receive a recommendation from the instructor in order to proceed to the internship courses HSVC 480 and HSVC 481. Prerequisite: PSY 240 or PSY 311; PSY 209 or PSY 312; HSVC 200 or HSVC 340; HSVC 250 or HSVC 310

HSVC 420

Advocacy for Diverse Communities (5)

Advocacy is a strong tradition in the human services professions, incorporating many means of working within and through larger systems on behalf of client groups. This course covers the role of the human services professional as an advocate for individuals, families, groups, and communities. It includes service delivery analysis and the identification and preparation of grants to assist in service delivery.

Course Entry Requirements:

PSY 311 Critical thinking and writing skills in social sciences, PSY 312 Research methods, and statistics in social sciences

HSVC 455

Trauma Recovery (5)

An investigation into the impact of physical and psychological trauma on individuals, groups, and communities, with particular attention to how post-traumatic stress contributes to the development of co-occurring substance abuse disorders. The course will cover basic principles of trauma recovery.

HSVC 470

Social Justice in Human Services (5)

Please check back soon for the full description.

HSVC 472

Change Theory and Motivational Interviewing Skills (5)

Please check back soon for the full description.

PSY 313

Ethics (5)

An overview of various philosophical approaches to ethical decision making and practical applications involving ethical problems that arise in contemporary society such as crime and punishment, marriage and the family, biotechnology, and workplace. Prerequisites: PSY 201, PSY 202, PSY 311 and PSY 312.

PSY 324

Introduction to Behavioral Pharmacology (5)

This course introduces students to the study of behavioral pharmacology using a blended approach of pharmacology, neuroscience, and psychology. Through various learning activities, students will explore how drugs affect nervous system functioning, neural and behavioral mechanisms that influence these effects, and how human performance – behavioral and cognitive – is impacted by the effects. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to discuss the neurological, behavioral, and subjective effects of drugs on the nervous systems' functioning. Course Entry Recommended: PSY 201, Introduction to Psychology PSY 202, Understanding Human Development

PSY 411

Organizational Behavior (5)

This course is designed to introduce students to the study of human behavior in organizations. Its purpose is to provide students with a working understanding of the behavior of individuals and groups within the organizational setting. In this course, we will explore how topics such as personality, attitudes, motivation, power and influence, leadership, conflict management, and organizational culture affect individual and organizational performance.
Prerequisites: PSY 201, PSY 202, PSY 311 and PSY 312.

SOC 412

Sociology of the Family (5)

This course will cover five broad but related areas of study: (1) the origins of the family, as well as basic concepts and theories underlying sociological discussions of family; (2) the relationship between the family and society through history; (3) work roles for men and women, both within and outside the home; (4) trends in non-marital lifestyles, marriage, divorce, and childbearing; and (5) the outlook for the future of the family.

— CHOOSE 1 OF THE FOLLOWING —

HSVC 491

Internship and Practicum in Human Services (5)

Please check back soon for the full description.

HSVC 492

Human Services Culminating Project (5)

Please check back soon for the full description.

Electives

Fulfilling the degree requirements for this program track includes 65 elective credits.

Upper Division Elective Courses

Fulfilling the degree requirements for this program track includes 5 upper-division elective credits.

Bachelor of Arts in Human Services – Specialized Study Emphasis

Preparatory Courses

HSVC 200

Introduction to Human Services (5)

This course provides an overview and introduction to working in human services. Types of service delivery systems are examined, and the process of helping, including the ethical and legal implications of working with clients is evaluated. Students analyze the professional roles of the human services worker and explore their own professional interests in human services work. Prerequisite: ENG 102 or equivalent

PSY 201

Introduction to Psychology (5)

This course examines the field of psychology from a variety of theoretical perspectives. Topics include: the physiological basis of mental functioning; the physical, cognitive and social aspects of lifespan development; learning, memory, and cognition; psychological disorders; emotions and health; thinking and language; intelligence and motivation; perception and sensation; and the various theories of personality.

PSY 202

Understanding Human Development (5)

An investigation into the biological, social, and psychological forces that shape the various stages of our lives. The course also examines patterns of difference due to factors such as gender, culture, disability, and socioeconomic status.

PSY 209

Fundamentals of Research Methods in Social Sciences (5)

As an introduction to research methods in social sciences, this course provides a foundation in the basic concepts of scientific method, research design, and statistical analysis. The focus is on empirical approaches to knowledge. This course also addresses the usefulness and limitations of statistical processes and their applications in social sciences. It emphasizes problem formulation, selection of research techniques, and results interpretation. Prerequisite: ENG 102 or Equivalent

PSY 220

Fundamentals of Abnormal Psychology (5)

The course assesses both past and present models of psychological abnormality including the current version of the diagnostic system. Other topics addressed include: problems of anxiety, mood, mind and body, social impact, psychosis, and personality. Specifically, this course serves as an introduction to abnormal psychology, with particular applicability to theories of personality and as a foundation to subsequent coursework in counseling and psychology. The areas addressed are broad, theoretical- and research-based, and of relevance in conceptualizing issues of both nature and extent of abnormal behavior, and the means by which prevention and intervention occurs. Prerequisite: Course Entry Requirements: PSY 201, PSY 202, PSY 240 or PSY 311, PSY 209 or PSY 312, or their equivalent

PSY 240

Critical Thinking & Writing Skills in Social Sciences (5)

This course develops students' writing skills. It introduces students to various forms of scholarly writing and focuses on topics such as style and mechanics, APA format, etc. In this course students will also learn about critical thinking process used to analyze social issues and identify rational solutions. Topics examined include: argument analyzing and building; forms and standards of critical thinking; and evaluating sources of information. Prerequisite: ENG 102 or Equivalent

Human Services Core

HSVC 370

Providing Services for Clients with Disabilities (5)

This course introduces students to human services practice with people with disabilities. This course will cover a brief review of disabilities and the disability rights movement and will provide an understanding of common issues that those with disabilities face. Students will learn how different perspectives and policies can impact those living with disabilities. The course will cover evidence-based practice in interventions and assessments for clients with disabilities.

HSVC 410

Assessment and Intervention with Diverse Populations (5)

Identifying and assessing client needs and developing treatment plans are core functions of human services professionals. This course engages students in the principles and practice of assessment; in the planning and implementing appropriate treatment strategies and referral services; and in evaluating intervention outcomes. It focuses on the differences and commonalities of serving diverse communities, in terms of ethnicity, culture, national origin, gender, and sexual orientation. This course will also include content and assignments related to the human services internship. Students must pass this course with a 2.5 GPA and receive a recommendation from the instructor in order to proceed to the internship courses HSVC 480 and HSVC 481. Prerequisite: PSY 240 or PSY 311; PSY 209 or PSY 312; HSVC 200 or HSVC 340; HSVC 250 or HSVC 310

HSVC 420

Advocacy for Diverse Communities (5)

Advocacy is a strong tradition in the human services professions, incorporating many means of working within and through larger systems on behalf of client groups. This course covers the role of the human services professional as an advocate for individuals, families, groups, and communities. It includes service delivery analysis and the identification and preparation of grants to assist in service delivery.

Course Entry Requirements: PSY 311 Critical thinking and writing skills in social sciences, PSY 312 Research methods and statistics in social sciences

HSVC 455

Trauma Recovery (5)

An investigation into the impact of physical and psychological trauma on individuals, groups, and communities, with particular attention to how post-traumatic stress contributes to the development of co-occurring substance abuse disorders. The course will cover basic principles of trauma recovery.

HSVC 470

Social Justice in Human Services (5)

Please check back soon for the full description.

HSVC 472

Change Theory and Motivational Interviewing Skills (5)

Please check back soon for the full description.

PSY 313

Ethics (5)

An overview of various philosophical approaches to ethical decision making and practical applications involving ethical problems that arise in contemporary society such as crime and punishment, marriage and the family, biotechnology, and workplace. Prerequisites: PSY 201, PSY 202, PSY 311, and PSY 312.

PSY 324

Introduction to Behavioral Pharmacology (5)

This course introduces students to the study of behavioral pharmacology using a blended approach of pharmacology, neuroscience, and psychology. Through various learning activities, students will explore how drugs affect nervous system functioning, neural and behavioral mechanisms that influence these effects, and how human performance – behavioral and cognitive – is impacted by the effects. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to discuss the neurological, behavioral, and subjective effects of drugs on the nervous systems' functioning. Course Entry Recommended: PSY 201, Introduction to Psychology PSY 202, Understanding Human Development

PSY 411

Organizational Behavior (5)

This course is designed to introduce students to the study of human behavior in organizations. Its purpose is to provide students with a working understanding of the behavior of individuals and groups within the organizational setting. In this course, we will explore how topics such as personality, attitudes, motivation, power and influence, leadership, conflict management, and organizational culture affect individual and organizational performance.
Prerequisites: PSY 201, PSY 202, PSY 311 and PSY 312.

SOC 412

Sociology of the Family (5)

This course will cover five broad but related areas of study: (1) the origins of the family, as well as basic concepts and theories underlying sociological discussions of family; (2) the relationship between the family and society through history; (3) work roles for men and women, both within and outside the home; (4) trends in non-marital lifestyles, marriage, divorce, and childbearing; and (5) the outlook for the future of the family.

— CHOOSE 1 OF THE FOLLOWING —

HSVC 491

Internship and Practicum in Human Services (5)

Please check back soon for the full description.

HSVC 492

Human Services Culminating Project (5)

Please check back soon for the full description.

Specialized Study Requirements

Fulfilling the degree requirements for this program track includes 25 upper-division credits. These courses must be approved by the program director.

Electives

Fulfilling the degree requirements for this program track includes 45 elective credits.

The Bachelor of Arts in Human Services program prepares students for a variety of careers in human services, healthcare, and social work, including jobs in group homes, substance use disorder treatment programs, counseling, case management, and youth service agencies.

Common job titles of alumni from this program are:

  • Child development worker
  • Case manager
  • Social work assistant
  • Chemical dependency counselor
  • Mental health aide
  • Community outreach worker
  • Youth activity counselor

Networking Opportunities

At CityU, you’ll have the opportunity to expand your professional network by connecting with faculty working in your field, students from around the globe, and alumni employed at Seattle’s top companies. Plus, you’ll be part of a supportive community that’s dedicated to helping you reach your career goals.

Tuition Cost

Learn more about tuition and fees for our undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral programs.

Financial Aid Opportunities

At CityU, we’re committed to helping students achieve their academic goals no matter their economic situations. Our financial aid counselors are here to find the resources you need to pay for your education, including grants, loans, work study, and scholarships.

Learn more about financial aid opportunities at CityU, or contact our Financial Aid Team at 800.426.5596, 206.239.4540, or finaid@cityu.edu.

Military Tuition Benefits

As a Yellow Ribbon school, CityU is proud to serve those who have served in the military. We offer military tuition discounts for active-duty servicemembers and their spouses and accept military benefits such as the Post 9/11 GI Bill® and Tuition Assistance.

Learn more about military tuition benefits, VA benefits, and military partnership programs designed to help you reach your military and career goals.

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