Developing as Scholars and Writers: Part 2 of 4 - Analysis

Developing as Scholars and Writers: Part 2 of 4 – Analysis

The Ed.D. in Leadership program develops you as scholars, practitioners, and leaders. This guide will help you articulate your position through application (Part 1), analysis (Part 2), synthesis (Part 3), and evaluation (Part 4).

Analysis

Looking closely at something to identify component parts, patterns, and themes. Researchers can analyze data. Scholars can analyze an article by breaking it up into smaller parts. Consultants can conduct a SWOT analysis by looking separately at strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats.

[1] Share the overall position of the article or book: This will provide context for the reader to understand why this resource was selected and how it connects to your position. Cite your source.

[2] Break down into component parts: This is an outline of the component parts of the position or idea that the author is discussing. This provides the framework for the discussion and support for your position.

[3] Share (or apply) the parts that are relevant to your position: This is the application component. It should be clear how the selected resource and framework ties to your position.

Example

Leaders at XYZ Organization need to evaluate their readiness for coaching. [1] In an article about the benefits of a culture of coaching on long-term management goals, Lindbom (2007) listed four characteristics of coaching: [2] (a) constant feedback; (b) discussing expectations; (c) top management commitment; and (d) formalized core competency and strategic goal. The author explained that these characteristics are important to the developing and sustaining a strong culture of coaching. [3] His inclusion of coaching being listed as a core competency and a strategic goal emphasizes the level of importance that coaching must have with executive management. Leaders at XYZ Organization have some steps to take before they will be ready to establish and sustain a coaching culture.