Gordon Albright School of Education
Diversity Scholarship Recipients - 2009

At City University of Seattle, we believe ethnic diversity in our student body is an important part of the overall learning experience. It is also our goal to educate and facilitate the placement of teachers of color in classrooms to serve our diverse communities.

Scholarships are available for the Bachelor of Arts in Education and Master in Teaching Programs. To qualify for a Diversity Scholarship each student must:

  • Be part of an ethnic minority population
  • Demonstrate financial need
  • Meet the admissions requirements for the BAEd or MIT programs
  • Be seeking initial teacher certification
To date over 70 scholarships have been awarded with a tuition value of nearly one million dollars.

 

Elana Towers
Elana Towers
In her experience as a young African American woman, √Člana Towers has come to realize that diversity exists on many levels and is open to a range of interpretations. To be a successful teacher, she knows she must embrace diversity fully and understand all the various ways people differ from one another, whether those differences are racial, ethnic, gender or age-related.


Lorena Vazquez
Lorena Vazquez
"In my six years of working with Head Start, I have been fortunate to work with children of various backgrounds including Russian, Vietnamese and Somali," says Gordon Albright School of Education student Lorena Vazquez. "Each child motivates me to challenge myself. I intend to continue in the field of education so that I can truly inspire my students as they so inadvertently inspire me."


Carrie Towey
Carrie "Miran" Towey
As a Korean-American student with a long history of working with diverse populations at home and abroad, Carrie "Miran" Towey believes that the strength of America lies in that we are a cultural melting pot. "Our amalgamation of culture and ethnicity is what makes us unique," says Towey. "It characterizes how change is the sole constant in what defines what is good and innovative in America."


Angelita Calle
Angelita Calle
Angelita Calle was inspired to pursue a teaching career when she was a volunteer in her daughter's kindergarten classroom. There she realized she didn't want just a job; she wanted to acquire the professional skills she needed to become a good teacher. Currently enrolled in City University of Seattle's Master in Teaching program, Calle plans to teach in a bilingual classroom setting after graduation and "be a role model for children."


Nelson Rojas
Nelson Rojas
Nelson Rojas has tutored low-income children of Hispanic heritage at a youth center and worked as a program coordinator for homeless African-American families in transitional housing. Both of these experiences have shown him how vital mentoring and caring for both children and parents of diverse backgrounds can be. A student in City University of Seattle's Master in Teaching program, Rojas plans to teach elementary school children after graduation, instilling the confidence and skills they need for life success.


Andres Lopez
Andres Lopez
In 2007, Andres Lopez and his wife decided to act on their true passions and embark upon careers that would improve social conditions in the United States. Recognizing a need for improved educational opportunities for minority youth, Lopez chose teaching. He knew that as a Mexican-American bilingual math teacher, he would have the greatest chance to connect with and impact the lives of kids with childhoods that closely paralleled his own.


Malia Orbino
Malia Orbino
Malia Orbino marvels at all the things she has learned working with diverse children, but one lesson stands out: "They all want the same things adults do," she says. "They want to be respected, listened to, taken seriously and accepted no matter what culture they're from, who they worship, or what tax bracket they're in." Currently enrolled in CityU's Master in Teaching program, Orbino is thankful for the life she has been able to lead. "I've worked with children for over 10 years and being able to touch the life of a child is unparallel to anything else I've ever experienced."


Cindy Le
Cindy Le
Cindy Le's experience as a Vietnamese-American child struggling to learn English and the teachers who helped her surmount the difficulties she faced are the inspiration and driving force behind her dream of becoming a teacher and helping diverse children. "With the extra help I received, I was able to overcome adversity and accomplish something," says Le. "These children remind me of myself and that is why I am so passionate about helping them succeed." The Bryant Elementary student tutor and Jumpstart team leader is currently enrolled in CityU's Master in Teaching program.


Elizabeth Phillips
Elizabeth Phillips
Elizabeth Phillips' track record as a community leader committed to serving others is awe-inspiring. In high school, she volunteered daily at the Adelle Maxwell Center, caring for children whose mothers were homeless or low-income. In college, she started a tutoring club for Polynesian grade school and high school students and an after-school program in a low-income area of Seattle. After completing her B.A. in English, Phillips trained in a bilingual English and Korean mission program before traveling to Jordan, Israel, Palestine and Pakistan. In these nations, she used her photography talents to capture the beauty.


Carmen Nickels
Carmen Nickels
One comment from a discouraged child struggling to learn English was all it took for Carmen Nickels to realize her calling in life. "In my native country, I could be a doctor," the little boy said. "Here, I'm having a hard time getting through one class." Nickels knew right then she had a purpose - that she could make a difference in a child's life. As a teacher, she hopes to use her bilingual skills to help minority students overcome the language barrier, as well as inspire and give all her students the tools they need to reach their goals and dreams.