Gordon Albright School of Education
Diversity Scholarship Recipients - 2007

At City University of Seattle, we believe ethnic diversity in our student body is an important part of the overall learning experience. It is also our goal to educate and facilitate the placement of teachers of color in classrooms to serve our diverse communities.

Scholarships are available for the Bachelor of Arts in Education and Master in Teaching Programs. To qualify for a Diversity Scholarship each student must:

  • Be part of an ethnic minority population
  • Demonstrate financial need
  • Meet the admissions requirements for the BAEd or MIT programs
  • Be seeking initial teacher certification
To date over 70 scholarships have been awarded with a tuition value of nearly one million dollars.

 

Maria Guizar
Maria S. Guizar
As she struggles to fulfill her lifelong dream of becoming a teacher, Maria Guizar draws her biggest inspiration from her experiences with students. Joel, a third grade ESL student, is one such student. Guizar vividly remembers the first time Joel read aloud in class. "Following his debut, thunderous applause erupted from the whole class," says Guizar. "Joel smiled bashfully while looking down at his desk. Then he looked at his teacher, who was glowing with pride, and said 'thank you.' As my eyes swelled with tears, I realized that these are the moments I live for; these are the moments that keep me going." Guizar is currently enrolled in City University of Seattle's Master in Teaching program.


Staysha Delgado
Staysha M. Delgado
Staysha Delgado is a Mexican-American who grew up in a predominantly white community. As a minority, she understands the perils of being treated differently. "In my high school, if you were a minority, it was frequently assumed that you had no plans for higher education," says Delgado. Overcoming low expectations, she believes, is the greatest challenge facing minority students today. Her goal as an educator is to bring attention to and eliminate educational disproportionality in regards to race. Delgado is currently enrolled in City University of Seattle's Master in Teaching program.


Lisa White
Lisa E. White
"I have spent most of my life working with kids, and I love it!" says Lisa White, a student in City University of Seattle's Master in Teaching program. White isn't kidding. Over the last several years, she has worked extensively with children of all ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds, building an impressive resume and forging a career path that will enable her to fulfill her lifelong dream of becoming a kindergarten teacher. "I want to encourage and motivate children to be successful in and out of the classroom," says White. "The teachers that I have had in the past were wonderful role models for me, and I would like to be the same for other children."


Roxana Amaral
Roxana M. Amaral
Roxana's family immigrated from Mexico to the United States when she was five. After attending Seattle Public Schools, she earned a B.A. in American Ethnic Studies from the University of Washington. Roxana then had the opportunity to work in the Seattle Public School District as a Seattle Team for Youth Case Manager. Working with at-risk youth, she became aware of the serious lack of minority teachers. Confident she would make a greater difference as a teacher; she enrolled in City University's One year Master in Teaching Program. She will receive her degree in May of 2008.


Scott Herman
Scott Herman
From his involvement in ethnically diverse YMCA programs to working with at-risk youth at Seattle Children's Home, Scott Herman's experiences have been "wide ranging, memorable, and educational." "My own experiences growing up in a Filipino-American family and living in various parts of the world have molded me into a person that values relationships and diversity," says Herman. "As classroom diversity grows, knowledge of how to integrate children of varying ethnicities or with varying psycho-social disorders will be very important." Currently, Herman is enrolled in City University of Seattle's Master in Teaching program.


Anan Velez
Anan Velez
Ana Velez grew up in both South America and the United States. A preschool teacher, she believes her unique upbringing has prepared her well to serve as a "cultural liaison" between minority children, their families, and schools. Currently enrolled in City University of Seattle's Master in Teaching program, Velez hopes to be the "unifying force" that enables her students to learn and play in an environment where they feel welcome.


John Dyrud
John Dyrud
John Paul Dyrud emigrated from South Korea to the United States when he was a teenager. Almost immediately, he became intrigued with people from cultures other than his own, associating with Laotians, Cambodians, Samoans, Native Americans, and other minority groups. His unique experiences helped shaped his view of the world and gave him a better understanding of the many issues they face. Currently enrolled in City University of Seattle's Master in Teaching program, Dyrud intends to draw on these experiences when he becomes a teacher, helping children "learn, flourish, and set aside differences".


Leni Carlos
Leni Carlos
Leni Sue Carlos is a Filipino-American woman with a long, impressive history of working with children and communities of diverse backgrounds. As a teacher, she hopes to serve as a positive role model for all her students, especially those of color. "I aspire to be the kind of teacher that can make learning fun and exciting while motivating students to do their best," she says. "I want to instill positive self-worth and confidence in my students and teach them to aim high in life and not give up pursuing their dreams." Carlos is currently a student in City University of Seattle's Master in Teaching program.


Mia Jefferies
Mia Jefferies
Currently enrolled in City University of Seattle's Gordon Albright School of Education, Mia Vigil knows exactly the kind of teacher she hopes to become: "The best teachers were the teachers who touched my human feeling, who connected with me on the same level of understanding, and who pushed me to become progressive in my learning, despite any barriers that were hindering me to succeed academically."


Sana Tariq
Sana Tariq
Sana Tariq was born and raised in Pakistan and immigrated to the United States at the age of 20. Currently enrolled in City University of Seattle's Albright School of Education, she hopes to one day return to her native country and create a school for students with disabilities. "Pakistan is a country where public education is a foreign notion and Special Education does not exist," says Tariq. "Children with mild disabilities remain undiagnosed and those with severe disabilities are usually confined to one room - a hidden source of shame for the family. I know that one has to dream big. If I didn't, I would have never had the courage to migrate to this country and build a life for myself."


Anna Marie Friedlander
Anna Marie Friedlander
Anna-Marie Friedlander emigrated from the Philippines with her family in 1999 when their local economy slumped and the cost of living skyrocketed. An artist, she had been working as an assistant animator at a creative studio in Mandaluyong City. Upon arriving in Washington State, she took the first job that came her way - working in a preschool. There, Friedlander discovered that not only did she want to become a teacher, but that she could use her talents as an artist to impact her students in a truly unique way.


Lisa Ahn
Lisa Ahn
During her sophomore year of high school, Lisa Ahn accompanied her church on a mission trip to Canada where she worked on an Indian reservation with 50 children. The experience affected her profoundly. "It was such an awakening for me," says Ahn. "A lot of these children came from broken families and were very poor. Being able to spend time with them was hard but at the same time so rewarding. I realized I have so much in life to be thankful for. All the things I used to worry about don't matter anymore."


Cecilia Rodriguez
Cecilia Rodriguez
Cecilia Rodriguez is a Mexican-American woman with an impressive track record of community involvement and working with children of diverse backgrounds. After realizing that her ability to speak two languages could enable her to be a positive role model for children, she decided to become a bilingual teacher. Rodriguez says: "I want to provide students with the tools and inspiration to continue their education and help them become productive members of our society."


Victoria Mayela Clayton
Victoria Mayela Clayton
Victoria Mayela Clayton was born and raised in Mexico. At the age of 13, she lost her father and was forced to work full time to support her family. Recognizing early on the importance of education, she persevered and managed to put herself through school. Clayton believes her background provides her with a unique advantage: the ability to teach by example. "We cannot take people where we have not been," she says. "As a first-generation Mexican-American teacher, I would be able to say 'If I can do it, you can do it.'"